Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd

News from around the World

News Archive

April 2017

Contents
  1. 28 April 2017 – World Day for Safety and Health at Work
  2. Event: NTD Summit 2017
  3. UK Nottinghamshire County Council fined £1 million after member of public crushed by tractor
  4. UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Health and Work strategy and plans
  5. Unite union calls for action on windfarm safety
  6. Safety a ‘vital’ union concern
  7. Work stress is a ‘critical’ issue for business
  8. IOSH report: Occupational safety and health considerations of returning to work after cancer
  9. 100 Years of Saving Lives – the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents celebrates
  10. 26 April 2017 is International Noise Awareness Day
  11. Get Britain Standing – 28 April 2017 – On your feet day!
  12. The only way is up? Social mobility and equal opportunities
  13. Euro Foundation Forum shines light on upward convergence
  14. Income inequality on the rise in wake of recession
  15. Commission launches public consultation for the evaluation of Eurofound, Cedefop, ETF and EU-OSHA
  16. Event: Webinar – A New Skillset? Employability in the Health and Safety Profession
  17. News from the British Safety Council
  18. UK Dementia Research Institute takes huge leap forward
  19. RR1088 – Multi-site delivery issues for heavy goods vehicles
  20. Work link to raised heart attack risk in firefighters
  21. UK Prime Minister should welcome European Parliament’s commitment to protecting workers’ rights, says TUC
  22. 28 April 2017 World Day for Safety and Health at Work
  23. CSB Investigators Deploying to Explosion at the Loy-Lange Box Company in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
  24. Boat Fire Safety Week UK: Covering coastal and inland waterways
  25. New Health and Safety Laboratory research reports
  26. Event: Fire Information Group (FIG UK) Seminar – “Mind the Gap in Fire Information: Update 2017”
  27. Health and Safety Executive (HSE) News: Changes To Approved Methods Of Roof Tile Cutting
  28. London Fire Brigade (LFB) reissues hoverboard blaze warning following child death in US
  29. Event: Connect – Collaborate – Create: Partners in Prevention 2017 Conference & Trade Show
  30. Drones inquiry launched
  31. Event: Diversity and Inclusion Management – Tools for creating fruitful work environment, organization culture and competitive advantage
  32. Events: Nordic Tour 2017 – How to Sustain an Aging Workforce?
  33. New report from IRSST Canada: Development of a Confined Space Risk Analysis and Work Categorisation Tool
  34. Event: OEMAC Conference
  35. Unions call for new deal to protect hairdressers
  36. Farmers killed at work and other agricultural safety and health advice
  37. Union concern after offshore workers get a radiation dose
  38. If you want to improve work safety, find a friend
  39. Event: Mental Health for Health and Safety Professionals Conference
  40. Event: AIChE’s 62nd Annual Safety in Ammonia Plants and Related Facilities Symposium
  41. Event: The Future of Blue-Light Services – Assessing the Policing and Crime Act and Embedding Collaboration in Every Area

28 April 2017 – World Day for Safety and Health at Work

The annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April promotes the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on the magnitude of the problem and on how promoting and creating a safety and health culture can help reduce the number of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.

With the celebration of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, the ILO promotes the creation of a global preventative safety and health culture involving ILO constituents and all key stakeholders in this field. In many parts of the world, national authorities, trade unions, employers’ organizations and safety and health practitioners organize activities to celebrate this date. You and your organisations – large or small are invited to join in celebrating this significant day.

The 28 April is also the International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers organised worldwide by the trade union movement since 1996. Its purpose is to honour the memory of victims of occupational accidents and diseases by organizing worldwide mobilizations and awareness campaigns on this date.

28 April is seen as a day to raise international awareness on occupational safety and health among trade unions, employers’ organizations and government representatives alike. The ILO acknowledges the shared responsibility of key stakeholders and encourages them to promote a preventive safety and health culture to fulfil their obligations and responsibilities for preventing deaths, injuries and diseases in the workplace, allowing workers to return safely to their homes at the end of the working day.

Every 15 seconds, a worker dies from a work-related accident or disease. Every 15 seconds, 153 workers have a work-related accident. Every day, 6,300 people die as a result of occupational accidents or work-related diseases – more than 2.3 million deaths per year.

Do whatever you can to ensure that all workers have a safer and healthier workplace in 2017.

Event: NTD Summit 2017

19-22 April 2017, Geneva, Switzerland

2017 marks the 5th anniversary of the World Health Organization’s roadmap on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) and the London Declaration. To celebrate this milestone, Uniting to Combat NTDs, the World Health Organization and the NTD community are hosting the NTD Summit in Geneva, Switzerland in April 2017.

We’ll celebrate the community’s achievements over the past 5 years and plan for the future as we aim to control, eliminate and eradicate 10 neglected tropical diseases. The summit will include technical discussions with our partners to define a clear path towards the 2020 goals and beyond.

More information: http://unitingtocombatntds.org/ntd-summit-2017

UK Nottinghamshire County Council fined £1 million after member of public crushed by tractor

UK Nottinghamshire County Council has been sentenced after a disabled member of the public was struck by a vehicle used for collecting branches.

Nottingham Crown Court heard employees were working in the County Park in Rufford Abbey on 1 June 2015, collecting branches and transporting them, using a tractor mounted grab attachment, to be burned.

At the same time a disabled man was on a guided walk in the park. The worker using the tractor to transport branches through the park could not see the member of public ahead and collided with him.

The 71-year-old man suffered serious bruising and injuries to arms legs and head.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the council failed to implement a safe system of work for this activity in that they failed to segregate vehicle movements from the public.

They failed to train the workers to the required level to operate the mounted grab and act as banksman. The machine was not suitable for transporting materials long distances.

The company also failed to supervise and adequately plan the work sufficiently in a public place and as a result put their own employees and members of the public at risk.

Nottinghamshire County Council of County Hall, West Bridgford, Nottingham pleaded guilty of breaching Sections 2 (1) and 3 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, and has been fined £1 million and ordered to pay costs of £10,269.85.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Martin Giles said: “The failure to properly plan this work and put in place straight forward control measures not only put the gentleman at risk but also endangered other members of the public walking with him.

“Duty holders have the responsibility to assess the work they do in public areas to lower the risk of harm and injury, particularly when they introduce new plant or equipment.”

UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Health and Work strategy and plans

Work-related stress, musculoskeletal disorders and occupational lung disease are priorities in HSE’s Health and Work strategy.

Work-related stress

The second most commonly reported cause of occupational ill health in Great Britain, accounting for 37% of all work-related ill-health cases, and 45% of all working days lost due to ill health.

Musculoskeletal disorders

The most common reported cause of occupational ill health in Great Britain, accounting for 41% of all work-related ill-health cases and 34% of all working days lost due to ill health.

Occupational lung disease

It continues to lead to an estimated 12 000 deaths each year.

HSE aim

To work in partnership with employers, employees and the wider health and safety community to reduce the incidence rate and number of new cases for these priority areas.

More information: www.hse.gov.uk/aboutus/strategiesandplans/health-and-work-strategy

Unite union calls for action on windfarm safety

There must be urgent action to improve workers’ welfare and safety on windfarms after two workers died in a fortnight, construction union Unite has said. On 15 March 2017, 37-year-old Portuguese worker Antonio Linares was killed in a fall at Scottish Power’s Kilgallioch Windfarm in South Ayrshire. Mr Linares was working for contractor Gamesa.

On 29 March 2017 a Spanish worker, believed to be in his twenties, fell from a turbine at Scottish Power’s Whitelee Windfarm in East Renfrewshire. The turbine is maintained by GE.

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-795-8-april-2017-0#_Toc479236777

Safety a ‘vital’ union concern

Health and safety is a ‘vital’ issue for unions, UNISON general secretary David Prentis has said. Speaking as hundreds of UNISON reps met at the union’s health and safety conference in Edinburgh, he said “as a union we’ve always been passionate about keeping people well, and fighting for healthier, safer workplaces. Thanks to the work of UNISON’s health and safety reps, public sector employees are less likely to suffer injury in the workplace. Tens of thousands of UK workers die every year because of their work and many more are injured.”

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-795-8-april-2017-0#_Toc479236778

Work stress is a ‘critical’ issue for business

A top stress expert has told a union conference that workplace stress is a ‘critical business issue’ that must be addressed. Professor Cary Cooper, in a presentation to more than 100 UK Prospect health and safety representatives, said a study a decade ago found that absenteeism cost employers £8.4 billion and presenteeism – working while sick – cost almost twice as much.

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-795-8-april-2017-0#_Toc479236779

IOSH report: Occupational safety and health considerations of returning to work after cancer

There is an increasing amount of information available for line managers, human resources an occupational health professionals on helping individuals with cancer stay in work.

However, until this research, there had been a lack of evidence on specific health and safety issues and effective approaches to risk assessment and risk management for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals, and others, to support those undergoing treatment or returning to work after cancer.

The research addresses this evidence gap by:

Report: https://www.iosh.co.uk/Books-and-resources/Return-to-work-after-Cancer.aspx

100 Years of Saving Lives – the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents celebrates

Since RoSPA’s early days improving road safety during the black-outs of the First World War, we have existed for a simple reason – to stop the needless devastation and heartache caused by accidents.

As events around the globe commemorate the centenary of the First World War, we’re also proud to mark our 100th anniversary during 2016/17.

We’re looking back over a century of changing attitudes to safety, our ground-breaking campaigns and the successes achieved, especially on the roads and in our workplaces where there have been big falls in the numbers of people killed or injured in accidents.

But we’re also remembering those who have died, and their loved ones left behind, as well as those whose injuries have changed their lives irrevocably.

It’s their stories coupled with the latest figures that show that accidental deaths and injuries are on the rise, especially in our homes, which means our passion to make a difference remains as strong as ever, especially when it comes to keeping kids safe.

We know there is still much hard work to be done and we’re confident that with our growing movement of supporters we will build a community where no family need suffer the anguish of an accident that didn’t have to happen.

More information: www.rospa100.com

26 April 2017 is International Noise Awareness Day

Doing Something about Noise! Crowd-Sourcing Noise Measurements

We’ve all known for a long time that exposure to workplace noise causes hearing loss – kids in school learn about it in Grade 4. Workers have been losing their hearing for years at alarming rates; an estimated 74% of construction workers by the time they reach retirement age.

Now is the time to do something about it!

April 26th is International Noise Awareness Day. This is the perfect time for all of us to measure the noise at your workstation on Wednesday, 26th April 2017, report the data you collect and begin the work on preventing/reducing noise exposures.

More information: www.ohcow.on.ca/avoidnoise

Get Britain Standing – 28 April 2017 – On your feet day!

Royal Mail is supporting On Your Feet Britain with a dedicated postmark that will be appearing on doormats on Friday April 28. The postmark will be urging the nation to get up, move it and groove it and join the #BIGWIGGLE for this year’s On Your Feet Britain #OYF17 Day. It will be applied to millions of items nationwide.

The nation is now counting down to #OYF17 on Friday 28th April! We have over 2,500 companies signed up and expect over 1,500,000 office workers to wiggle and waggle it.

Please get your network to take part too. We want to get as many office workers to “Get up offa that thing”.

We look forward to getting you moving! What will you do?

More information: http://onyourfeetday.com

The only way is up? Social mobility and equal opportunities

EU citizens and policymakers are becoming increasingly concerned that – for the first time in decades – younger generations will have fewer opportunities for upward social mobility than preceding generations. Reflecting this concern, Eurofound has just published a report that is the first to examine patterns of social mobility across all 28 Member States.

The report, Social mobility in the EU, examines to what extent family background has determined people’s prospects for social mobility, identifying key barriers to social mobility and reviewing policies aimed at facilitating upward social mobility and equal opportunities.

On 4 May 2017, Eurofound is organising together with the OECD a high-level conference in Paris, France entitled The only way is up? Social mobility and equal opportunities to discuss the findings.

Euro Foundation Forum shines light on upward convergence

Eurofound’s fifth Foundation Forum – the Agency’s flagship event – will take place on 14–15 November 2017 in Dublin Castle, Dublin, Ireland.

The high-level event, supported by the Irish government, will examine convergence in Europe from a range of perspectives. In particular, participants will focus on upward convergence in living and working conditions, including employment.

Arriving at such convergence is a key element in ensuring political and societal support for the European project; to this end, around 200 participants will seek to agree on policy pointers for possible future action. Eurofound has been bringing leading policymakers together in its Forums since 2002, to contribute its findings to the debate and facilitate the exchange of knowledge, ideas and experiences.

More information: https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/events/foundation-forum-2017

Income inequality on the rise in wake of recession

EU-wide income inequality had declined notably prior to 2008, driven by a strong process of income convergence between European countries.

The Great Recession broke this trend. After 2008, income convergence has been sluggish, while inequality within many countries has increased significantly.

In a new blog piece on the Agency’s website, Eurofound researchers Carlos Vacas-Soriano and Enrique Fernández-Macías look at the development of income inequalities in Europe since the Great Recession.

A key finding emerging from the research is that income disparities within EU Member States are greater than those between Member States.

More information: https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/news/news-articles/eu-income-inequality-and-the-great-recession

Commission launches public consultation for the evaluation of Eurofound, Cedefop, ETF and EU-OSHA

The European Commission has launched a public consultation in the context of the evaluation of the four EU agencies under the remit of DG Employment: Eurofound; the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (Cedefop); the European Training Foundation (ETF); and the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA).

All citizens, public and private organisations are welcomed to contribute to this consultation!

Contributions are sought in particular from stakeholders of Eurofound, Cedefop and EU-OSHA during the period 2011-2016.

Event: Webinar – A New Skillset? Employability in the Health and Safety Profession

Tuesday, 9th May 2017, 11:00 – 12.00 (BST)

For the last few years, there has been a growing debate in the health and safety profession, that a new skillset is needed. A technical understanding and knowledge of the law are not enough to win over hearts and minds.

Join Emma Head from HS2, John Dunne from Wates, Anna Keen of Acre Frameworks and Heather Beach from The Healthy Work Company as they examine exactly what behaviours and competencies are required for the modern-day health and safety professional.

Don’t miss out by registering: http://barbour.ubm-info.com/c/125RPNpe9mzmBv2IIEnwIgJTXug

The speakers will look at:

News from the British Safety Council

The future of work... and risk

The world of work is changing fast and some thought-leaders explore what it means for how we live and our wellbeing in a new British Safety Council film; includes HSE, PwC and Professor Cary Cooper.

60 years of saving lives

A new British Safety Council film explores the history of the organisation, with long-forgotten archive footage illuminating how we went about persuading the world to care about health and safety.

Free British Safety Council resources

To mark our 60th anniversary year, for the first time and for one year, we are offering some of our most treasured resources to small businesses of 50 employees and under and charities of 100 employees or under, for free.

Find out more about how your business can benefit from becoming a supporter.

UK Dementia Research Institute takes huge leap forward

Six of the UK’s leading research universities have been awarded centre status in the landmark UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI), laying the foundation for an eventual research community of more than 400 researchers dedicated to addressing the challenge of defeating dementia.

The initial UK DRI funding worth £55 million, which will be supplemented by a further £20 million from the institutions hosting the centres, will get the institute up and running and kick-start research that will provide answers to some of the most pressing questions in the field of neurodegenerative disease.

The centre awards come as 27 foundation research programmes have been announced as the institute sets to establish and develop over the coming months.

Centres of excellence

Established in response to the Government’s 2020 Challenge on Dementia, the UK DRI is a joint £250 million investment into dementia research led by the MRC alongside founding charity partners Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer’s Research UK.

Bringing together world-leading expertise across the spectrum of dementia research and maximising the benefit of cutting-edge facilities and skills, the newly announced centres have been named as the University of Cambridge, Cardiff University, the University of Edinburgh, Imperial College London and King’s College London. Associate Directors of the UK DRI have been named respectively as Professors Giovanna Mallucci, Julie Williams, Giles Hardingham, Paul Matthews and Chris Shaw. The centres join University College London (UCL) which was confirmed in December 2016 as the institute’s hub of research activity and operational headquarters, alongside the announcement of UK DRI Director, Professor Bart De Strooper.

The scientific strengths and expertise across the six UK DRI centres reflect the wide-ranging and ambitious research the institute will deliver to better understand the mechanisms that underpin neurodegenerative diseases.

Gathering pace

Using state-of-the-art research and imaging facilities across the institute, the foundation research programmes will seek to expand on the traditional views of neurodegenerative disease in the complex environment of the brain and take into account interactions with wider physiological processes in the human body that may influence the risk of developing dementia and its rate of progression.

Twenty professors and seven fellows have been selected to lead the institute’s programmes of research and recruitment for other positions in the institute will start later this year.

The foundation programmes will see the UK DRI research teams investigating new molecular and cellular mechanisms that could be responsible for neurodegenerative brain diseases. The institute’s researchers will also be exploring ways to manipulate the brain’s natural defence mechanisms as they seek to identify and test new and existing drugs and treatments.

They will also be turning their attention to the role of metabolism, sleep and bacteria in the gut, which are increasingly implicated in determining the likelihood of developing dementia.

An equally important programme of research looking at the best ways to care for people with dementias will be integrated into the institute’s research strategy next year to compliment the strong biomedical focus.

Professor Bart De Strooper, Director of the UK DRI, said: “The shared vision between the centres will be at the heart of the UK DRI’s success, and this creativity at the borders will lead us to truly understand dementias and how they progress. We selected the centres based on innovative, excellent science, evidence of strong leadership, the alignment of goals with the UK DRI as a whole, and the ability to grow and collaborate as the institute gathers pace.”

Dr Rob Buckle, Chief Science Officer at the MRC, said: “The UK DRI is bringing together the most promising dementia science in the UK and the announcement of the centres and their foundation programmes is a huge step in its ambition to become an internationally-recognised national institute. The six centres that will form the core of the institute were recognised for their outstanding knowledge and capabilities across the dementias, but most importantly their commitment to work with colleagues old and new, and far and wide, to gain fresh new insights into the disease.”

Science Minister Jo Johnson said: “Dementia affects millions of people around the world, but through greater understanding we can make significant steps forward to improve lives.

“Today’s announcement of the institute’s centre locations demonstrates the UK’s existing wealth of knowledge and research expertise, and the leadership role we can take in developing new treatments to tackle this disease. This is exactly the type of project our Industrial Strategy will build on to ensure the UK remains at the forefront of global science.”

For more information about the foundation programmes at the UK DRI visit www.ukdri.ac.uk

RR1088 – Multi-site delivery issues for heavy goods vehicles

The purpose of this scoping study from the HSE’s Health and Safety Laboratories was to establish whether there were specific safety issues relating to multi-site deliveries, and how widespread these were within the UK road haulage industry. This study builds on previous work carried out on load securing of goods transported by road.

Multi-site deliveries in themselves do not appear to introduce additional hazards, over and above those encountered in the haulage industry overall. However, they do appear to increase the exposure to hazards because drivers are required to access the load area more frequently and the profile of multi-site deliveries may mean that vehicles are delivering to sites where risks are not adequately controlled.

Awareness of the risks of work activities appeared to be generally quite low amongst both consignors and hauliers, particularly with regard to the load retention properties of curtain-sided vehicles. While load planning would generally be considered desirable, it appeared that planning based purely on predicated drop order could result in poorly-loaded, unstable loads. This could be exacerbated once the first delivery had taken place, even if the load was re-loaded.

The wider utilisation of risk assessment, appropriate load planning, cooperation and clear communication between dutyholders could significantly reduce the risk of harm during multi-site deliveries.

Full report: www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr1088.htm

Exposure to heat and physical exertion greatly increase the risk of firefighters’ suffering a heart attack, researchers have said. The study may explain why heart disease is the leading cause of death among on-duty firefighters, the researchers from the University of Edinburgh said. The research, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), is published in the journal Circulation. Nineteen non-smoking, healthy firefighters were randomly selected from the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service to take part in the study.

They took part in exercises, including an attempted mock rescue from a two-storey structure, which exposed them to extremely high temperatures, while wearing heart monitors. The study found their core body temperatures remained high for three to four hours following exposure to the fire. It also found their blood became stickier and was about 66 per cent more likely to form potentially harmful clots. The firefighters’ blood vessels also failed to relax in response to medication. The research team believe that the increase in clotting was caused by a combination of fluid loss due to sweating and an inflammatory response to the fire heat, which resulted in the blood becoming more concentrated and so more likely to clot. The researchers also found that the exposure to fire caused minor injury to the heart muscles.

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-795-8-april-2017-0#_Toc479236783

UK Prime Minister should welcome European Parliament’s commitment to protecting workers’ rights, says TUC

Commenting on the European Parliament’s vote on 5 April 2017 pushing for a post-Brexit deal between the EU and the UK that protects current and future workplace rights, TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said:

“Workers’ rights must be at the heart of Britain’s deal with the EU. It must protect current rights, like paid holidays, equal pay, and fairness for agency workers. And it must guarantee a level playing field into the future, so working people in Britain don’t fall behind our European neighbours.

“The Prime Minister should welcome the European Parliament’s commitment to workers’ rights in the UK. It gives her a great opportunity to put into action her promise to protect and enhance working people’s rights. A strong agreement on rights at work must be the starting point for negotiating a good deal that works for business and working people.”

28 April 2017 World Day for Safety and Health at Work

The annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April promotes the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on the magnitude of the problem and on how promoting and creating a safety and health culture can help reduce the number of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.

With the celebration of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, the ILO promotes the creation of a global preventative safety and health culture involving ILO constituents and all key stakeholders in this field. In many parts of the world, national authorities, trade unions, employers’ organizations and safety and health practitioners organize activities to celebrate this date. You and your organisations – large or small are invited to join in celebrating this significant day.

The 28 April is also the International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers organised worldwide by the trade union movement since 1996. Its purpose is to honour the memory of victims of occupational accidents and diseases by organizing worldwide mobilizations and awareness campaigns on this date.

28 April is seen as a day to raise international awareness on occupational safety and health among trade unions, employers’ organizations and government representatives alike. The ILO acknowledges the shared responsibility of key stakeholders and encourages them to promote a preventive safety and health culture to fulfil their obligations and responsibilities for preventing deaths, injuries and diseases in the workplace, allowing workers to return safely to their homes at the end of the working day.

Every 15 seconds, a worker dies from a work-related accident or disease. Every 15 seconds, 153 workers have a work-related accident. Every day, 6,300 people die as a result of occupational accidents or work-related diseases – more than 2.3 million deaths per year.

Do whatever you can to ensure that all workers have a safer and healthier workplace in 2017.

CSB Investigators Deploying to Explosion at the Loy-Lange Box Company in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

A three-person investigative team from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) is deploying to the scene of an incident that killed three people and injured four others on Monday, 3 April 2017 at the Loy-Lange Box Company in Saint Louis, Missouri.

Two of the fatalities were members of the public. According to initial reports, the incident took place when a boiler exploded at the plant, where one worker was killed. The force of the explosion launched the boiler into the air where it flew approximately 500 feet before landing on a nearby laundry facility, killing two members of the public.

CSB Chairperson Vanessa Sutherland said, “The CSB’s mission is to investigate and issue recommendations that promote safety at industrial facilities as well as for nearby communities. As a result of Monday’s explosion, our team will be examining what if any safeguards were in place to protect the workers at the Loy-Lange Box Company, as well as for those in the adjoining building.”

The CSB is an independent federal agency whose mission is to drive chemical safety change through independent investigations to protect people and the environment.

The agency’s board members are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. CSB investigations look into all aspects of chemical incidents, including physical causes such as equipment failure as well as inadequacies in regulations, industry standards, and safety management systems.

For more information, contact public@csb.gov

Boat Fire Safety Week UK: Covering coastal and inland waterways

29 May - 4 June 2017

The Fire Kills campaign is again working with the BSS to help raise awareness of fire/CO safety on boats and in the boating community.

The aim of the UK Boat Fire Safety Week is to raise awareness of how boaters on both coastal and inland waterways can prevent fire and CO incidents and how to plan to react if an incident occurs. Fire and rescue authorities can support this by engaging with boaters to promote the safety messages published in the Fire Kills/BSS Fire Safety on Boats and the BSS/CoGDEM Carbon Monoxide Safety on Boats leaflets – both freely available from the BSS.

Whether it’s at marinas, canals, lakes, coastal inlets, harbours and quaysides, the national population of over 450,000 motorised boats is presenting a potential risk of fire, explosion and CO poisoning incidents across the whole of the UK. Most fire and rescue authorities will have some form of boating risk in their areas and may wish to consider addressing boat owners within their risk reduction initiatives.

Due to the nature of boats, you may wish to consider promoting CO safety messages alongside fire safety. In the two decades leading up to 2013, 65 boaters died in boat fires and CO incidents. In the last 12 months, one more narrowboat dweller has died in a fire and one person living on his motor cruiser has died from carbon monoxide poisoning. Furthermore, 13 people including children have had hospital treatment due to explosions and fires on boats in 2015.

Boat Safety Scheme, First Floor North, Station House, 500 Elder Gate, Milton Keynes MK9 1BB | Tel: 0333 202 1000 | www.boatsafetyscheme.org

New Health and Safety Laboratory research reports

RR1100 – Evaluation of the DRIFT gas dispersion model version 3.6.4

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) uses gas dispersion modelling in its assessment of the hazards and risks posed by toxic and flammable substances stored at major hazards sites. To update its dispersion modelling capability, HSE recently commissioned ESR Technology to develop a new version of the gas dispersion model DRIFT (Dispersion of Releases Involving Flammables or Toxics). The new version of the model, DRIFT Version 3 (DRIFT 3), includes a significant number of modelling enhancements over the version of DRIFT previously used within HSE (DRIFT 2.31). These include the extension of the model to treat buoyant plumes and time varying releases. Prior to DRIFT 3 being adopted for use by HSE, it must undergo thorough evaluation and assessment.

This report describes the evaluation of DRIFT version 3.6.4 in accordance with a Model Evaluation Protocol originally developed for the evaluation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapour dispersion models. The protocol sets out a method of scientific assessment, verification and validation for heavy gas dispersion models where the results are recorded in a model evaluation report (MER). Overall, the evaluation exercise found DRIFT version 3.6.4 to be fit for purpose.

Full report: www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr1100.htm

RR1088 – Multi-site delivery issues for heavy goods vehicles

The purpose of this scoping study was to establish whether there were specific safety issues relating to multi-site deliveries, and how widespread these were within the UK road haulage industry. This study builds on previous work carried out on load securing of goods transported by road.

Multi-site deliveries in themselves do not appear to introduce additional hazards, over and above those encountered in the haulage industry overall. However, they do appear to increase the exposure to hazards because drivers are required to access the load area more frequently and the profile of multi-site deliveries may mean that vehicles are delivering to sites where risks are not adequately controlled. Awareness of the risks of work activities appeared to be generally quite low amongst both consignors and hauliers, particularly with regard to the load retention properties of curtain-sided vehicles. While load planning would generally be considered desirable, it appeared that planning based purely on predicated drop order could result in poorly-loaded, unstable loads. This could be exacerbated once the first delivery had taken place, even if the load was re-loaded.

The wider utilisation of risk assessment, appropriate load planning, cooperation and clear communication between dutyholders could significantly reduce the risk of harm during multi-site deliveries.

Full report: www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr1088.htm

RR1099 – Review of consequence model evaluation protocols for major hazards under the EU SAPHEDRA platform

To safeguard the public, predictive mathematical models are used to estimate the potential consequences of major accident hazards in order to inform risk based decision making. For instance, these models cover release, dispersion, fire and explosion of hazardous substances. It is important that the performance and limits of applicability of these models is well understood. Model evaluation is a process that can be used to provide assurance of the robustness of predictions and to guide improvements in the modelling techniques. Consequence model evaluation has been a significant area of activity for many years and there have been several European initiatives on harmonisation and evaluation.

This report describes work done within the ‘SAPHEDRA’ collaborative EU platform for evaluation of consequence models. The overall aim of the platform is to derive a commonly agreed model evaluation protocol for consequence models and a series of example applications based on well-established experiments. The work described here is a review of existing model evaluation protocols with recommendations for the structure and content of a new evaluation method that can be broadly applied to models used in risk assessment studies for hazardous materials.

Full report: www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr1099.htm

Event: Fire Information Group (FIG UK) Seminar – “Mind the Gap in Fire Information: Update 2017”

Wednesday 18 October 2017 starting at 13.15

Location: Senate Room, Imperial Hotel, Russell Square, London

This seminar is kindly sponsored by Lane, Jefferies & Associates Ltd and Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd

12.30 – 13.15

Registration

13.15 – 13.25

Introduction by Chair Sheila Pantry OBE

Updating “Mind the Gap in Fire Information”

Setting the scene – FIG UK and fire information worldwide

13.25 – 13.55

Jeremy Fraser-Mitchell

BRE Global

Fire Research and new trends also where to keep up to date in information

13.55 – 14.25

Martin Hembling, Sales & Marketing Director, Swiftclean Building Services

Kitchen Extract Systems and Fire Safety Management also where to keep up to date in information

14.25 – 14.55

Stewart Kidd, Chartered Security Professional, Loss Prevention Consultancy Ltd

Fire Safety – Some impacts of the Law of Unintended Consequences

14.55 – 15.15

Break

15.15 – 15.45

Electrical Safety First

ESF major work, fires and product recalls, drones, e-cigarettes and also where to keep up to date in information

15.45 – 16.15

Charlie Pugsley Head of Fire Investigations, London Fire Brigade (LFB)

New fire trends (and what we should NOT be doing), new materials used in buildings, high-rise buildings and their performance in fires and also where to keep up to date in information.

16.15 – 16.45

Dr Ivan Vince, ASK Consultants

Tales from the Expert Witness.

16.45 – 17.00

Q&A

Summing up – Chairman

17.00 – 18.00

Networking

Complimentary refreshments and networking in The Imperial Hotel 1st Floor Bar.

Seminar Delegate Rates

CPD certificate will be awarded

To book a place or for any further information contact: Sheila Pantry OBE Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd, 85 The Meadows, Todwick, Sheffield S26 1JG, UK | Tel: +44 (0) 1909 771024 | Email: sp@sheilapantry.com | www.sheilapantry.com

Health and Safety Executive (HSE) News: Changes To Approved Methods Of Roof Tile Cutting

When cutting roof tiles, workers are exposed to respirable crystalline silica (RCS). This dust, if breathed in, causes severe lung diseases such as silicosis. HSE have produced a video of the effects of silicosis on people’s lives. To view a video on the impact of silicosis visit HSL’s Case Studies Webpage.

For more information on silicosis and lung disease visit HSE’s Lung Disease Web pages.

HSE has identified reducing incidents of ill health as one of the top three strategic priorities for the next three to five years as set out in the construction sector plan, Occupational Lung Disease is a particular focus.

London Fire Brigade (LFB) reissues hoverboard blaze warning following child death in US

LFB have reissued their hoverboard fire warning after a girl died in a blaze, which began before 2000 on Friday 10 March 2017 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA and is thought to be the first death in the US as a result from a blaze caused by the battery operated toy.

The blaze, which began before 2000 on Friday 10 March 2017 in Harrisburg. The girl’s father and a teenage boy were both treated for smoke inhalation and released shortly thereafter, and two other girls who had been in the house remain in critical condition according to CNN.

Major safety concerns have been raised about the batteries, plugs, cables and chargers within some of the hoverboards on sale. Since October 2015 the Brigade have attended eight fires caused by hoverboards.

More information: www.london-fire.gov.uk/news/LatestNewsReleases_Brigadereissueshoverboardblaze.asp

Event: Connect – Collaborate – Create: Partners in Prevention 2017 Conference & Trade Show

2-3 May 2017, Mississauga, Canada

A unique, dynamic, and fun exhibit area awaits you at Partners in Prevention 2017 Conference & Trade Show, 2-3 May 2017. Where else can you climb through a dark and dirty confined space? Repel down the side of a trailer? Or drive a pedal cart while wearing goggles that simulate impairment? “There’s something for everyone,” says WSPS trade show organizer Kristina Toomey, “including interactive activities, demos, games, information sessions, freebies, contests, and much more!”

The largest event of its kind in Canada, the Partners in Prevention 2017 trade show boasts 400+ exhibitors offering new and innovative health and safety products, services and resources. “There’s no better place to see, touch and learn about the latest and greatest in the industry, to find new ideas, to get answers to your question, or to meet up with old connections and make new ones,” says Kristina.

New signage, layout, and colours will make it easier to navigate the bustling trade show floor, she notes. “It has a nice clean look that will enable delegates to quickly and easily find what they are looking for.”

Contact: Workplace Safety and Health Services | www.wsps.ca/pip/pip_home.html

Drones inquiry launched

The UK Transport Committee launches an inquiry into civilian drones. The aim of this inquiry is to consider how the benefits of drone technology can be maximised within a robust safety framework.

Use of civilian drones in the UK – both recreational and commercial – is increasing. Drones are now used for a wide range of purposes and there is a significant scope for expansion in the future. A report by PwC found that the emerging global market for business services using drones is valued at over $127 billion.

However, the increasing use of drones also raises a number of regulatory and operational issues. This includes risk to other aircraft – an area where laser pens are also an increasing concern. The Department has recently consulted on its drones policy.

Further information: https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/transport-committee/news-parliament-2015/drones-inquiry-launch-16-17

Event: Diversity and Inclusion Management – Tools for creating fruitful work environment, organization culture and competitive advantage

7-9 June 2017, Soria Moria Hotel, Oslo, Norway

Diversity management can be seen as an internal process aiming at creating a positive work environment by taking individual differences into consideration. Diversity is about acceptance and respect. Diversity management is one of the keys to growth in today’s competitive market. Organizations cannot hide behind lack of cultural intelligence. Organizations that seek market or societal relevancy must embrace diversity in how they think and act. Diversity is not only about making the numbers but rather how an organisation treats its people authentically down to the roots of its aim or organization model.

More information and registration: https://niva.org/course/diversity-and-inclusion-management

Events: Nordic Tour 2017 – How to Sustain an Aging Workforce?

June 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark (6.6), Lund, Sweden (8.6), Oslo, Norway (20.6), Reykjavik, Iceland (21.6)

Increased labour force participation and prolonged working lives are goals with high priority on the political agenda in most of the world’s industrialised nations, including the Nordic countries. Finding ways to sustain an ageing population in the workforce requires more knowledge about the processes shaping inclusion in and exclusion from the labour market. However, these processes involve complex interactions between multiple factors at several levels.

Nordic Tour is a series of one-day thematic lecture seminars which will circulate in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Iceland. The aim is to give national actors in each of these countries the opportunity to compare their own country’s position and strategies with the similar practices and perspectives of other Nordic countries.

Each of the seminars acts as an independent entity.

More information and registration: www.niva.org

New report from IRSST Canada: Development of a Confined Space Risk Analysis and Work Categorisation Tool

The IRSST just published a new research report those purpose is to contribute to confined space accident prevention by helping companies apply existing regulations. Researchers wanted to gain a better understanding of confined space risk management and identify issues based on the literature and field observations, and develop a confined space risk analysis and work categorization tool that meets the needs defined in the first stage of the project.

A confined space is any area that is completely or partially enclosed and is not designed for human occupation, nor intended to be, but may occasionally be occupied for the performance of work. (Definition from Quebec Regulation respecting Occupational Health and Safety (ROHS), section 1) A worker may therefore enter such a space that is not a workstation, has restricted access, and presents a risk to health and safety.

The issue of confined space work cuts across a wide range of sectors: municipal, manufacturing, chemical, military, agricultural, construction and transportation. The most common confined spaces in industry are tanks, reservoirs, silos, vats, manholes, pits, sewers, pipes and tank cars or trucks that have certain characteristics defined in the regulations. Workers enter confined spaces to perform maintenance, manufacturing or other tasks (e.g., construction industry).

The occupational health and safety hazards are primarily atmospheric, biological, physical and ergonomic. The risks run by workers who enter these confined spaces are potentially high because of the confinement, inadequate natural ventilation, need to work in isolation, and access, rescue and communication problems. Moreover, accidents are common in confined spaces.

The findings show that, first, the number of fatal accidents caused by an equipment energy control problem highlights the importance of mechanical hazards in confined spaces. A more multidisciplinary approach would therefore seem desirable. Second, the risk estimation and assessment stages are seldom dealt with formally in the literature, with the exception of atmospheric risks.

A five-step risk assessment tool was developed for confined spaces.

The tool can be used to determine, on the basis of explicit criteria, whether any two confined space job assignments are actually identical, with a view to simplifying risk reduction work if possible. The tool can also help decide, on the basis of predetermined criteria, whether rescue without entry is possible a priori and whether the residual risks are acceptable. Twenty-two confined space experts were asked to test the tool’s practicality and suitability. The tool was also compared with other types of tools recommended in the literature or by businesses for analysing risks associated with confined space work.

This study provides support for designers, safety officers and rescuers in their respective efforts to improve the health and safe working conditions of people who must enter confined spaces. The tool can be used to design a confined space or to assess an existing one.

To download the report: www.irsst.qc.ca/en/publications-tools/publication/i/100915/n/confined-space-analysis-tool

Event: OEMAC Conference

11-13 June 11, 2017, Sheraton Hotel, St. John’s, Newfoundland, St

The OEMAC conference attracts 150+ delegates from three groups: occupational medicine physicians, family physicians with interest and experience in occupational medicine, and other healthcare professionals with specific education and experience related to occupational health.

Themes: “Marijuana in the Workplace, Disability and Accommodation” and “Contemporary Issues in Occupational Medicine”.

More information: http://oemac.org/annual-conference/2017-conference

Unions call for new deal to protect hairdressers

Shopworkers’ union Usdaw is calling for a “new deal” to protect hairdressers. The union, which represents many of Britain’s estimated 140,000 salon workers, says they face risks ranging from musculoskeletal disorders, to dermatitis, asthma and cancer.

Paddy Lillis, the union’s deputy general secretary, said the government needed to give “proper protection” to barbers and hairdressers, the majority of whom are female and younger than 40. A Europe-wide agreement on health and safety standards for the industry has been blocked by the European Commission, under pressure from successive British governments

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-791-11-march-2017#_Toc476836125

Farmers killed at work and other agricultural safety and health advice

Fatal accidents in agriculture continue to devastate families and businesses. Recent press coverage has highlighted awful farming tragedies that have occurred this year including the death of a child. HSE is working closely with the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP) to publicise key messages and to prevent further heartbreak.

The stark reality is that each one of these deaths could have been prevented with simple well known precautions. Tragically there is nothing new about the way that people are killed on Britain’s farms. Following existing guidance would dramatically reduce this needless death toll. Management of risk on farms has to improve.

Take time out now to consider how you can effectively manage the risks to protect yourself, your employees and family at this busy time.

Machinery maintenance

Many deaths and serious accidents happen during maintenance work. Don’t be tempted to make do or take short cuts for example when working under vehicles or equipment. It’s simply not worth taking the chance.

Make sure your tractors, trailers and other farm machines are properly maintained and used safely. Before bringing equipment back into use check to see if brakes are working effectively and if any guards are missing, or damaged. Replace them.

Check hitching and attachment points are in good condition, and not excessively worn. Use the machinery maintenance check lists to help you. Whenever carrying out machinery maintenance always follow the safe stop procedure. Don’t carry out work whilst machinery is running.

Farm vehicles and children

Sadly, tractor and machinery overturns and being run over by a farm vehicle continue to be significant causes of death and serious injury to farmers. All drivers should be trained and competent and the yard and traffic routes provided with mirrors, barriers and signage to reduce blind spots and keep people and vehicles separated. And don’t forget to include arrangements for contractors and delivery vehicles.

Take action now to exclude children from the workplace. Always remember that children must have a safe play area away from farm activity, which is secure and prevents them from straying into hazardous areas.

Prosecution: A self-employed farm worker has been imprisoned after running over and killing a young boy with his tractor. See: Tractor driver imprisoned for running over and killing a child.

Health risks during lambing and avoiding human infection

Help workers understand health risks associated with close contact with animals and help them take appropriate precautions. There are particular risks to women who may be pregnant and come into close contact with sheep during lambing, risking their own health and that of their unborn child.

The following guidance is helpful: Pregnancy: advice on contact with animals that are giving birth.

These risks are not only associated with sheep, nor confined only to the spring (when the majority of lambs are born). Cattle and goats that have recently given birth can also carry similar infections.

All farm animals naturally carry a range of diseases, some of which can also affect humans. These diseases are known as zoonoses, and if you work with animals your health may be at risk. See Protecting farmers and farm workers from zoonoses

Visitor attractions/open farms

If you have open days or have a visitor attraction thoroughly review your arrangements in readiness for the new season and Easter holidays, pay particular attention to the hand washing facilities.

This guide will help: Preventing or controlling ill health from animal contact at visitor attractions or open farms.

Following this advice should prevent serious E-Coli, or similar, outbreaks.

Cattle and rights of way

Use of footpaths and bridleways by visitors is increasing now days are longer and warmer. Always consider and assess the nature of cattle in fields with footpaths e.g. where possible locate cows with young calves in fields with no public access. Follow the HSE guidance on Cattle and public access in England and Wales and Scotland.

Good herd management is vital to keep people safe: Animals known to be aggressive should be removed from the herd and regular field visits and checks can identify agitated animals or highlight issues that could lead to problems e.g. damaged fencing. Follow the FSP guidance on are you handling your cattle safely?

Prosecution: A farmer has been given a prison sentence after one person was killed and another seriously injured when attacked by cows grazing in a field crossed by a footpath. Man killed and another seriously injured by cows

Slurry gas kills

Slurry gas, generated when slurry is disturbed e.g. whilst stirred before being pumped into tankers or spreaders, is highly toxic, heavier than air and regularly kills farmers and people trying to save them. In addition farmers and children drown when covers collapse or edges of pits and stores are not protected by fencing or barriers.

Take steps to avoid slurry gas exposure and protect slurry stores see Managing slurry on farms

New HSL research

Research Report (RR1085) on exploring the human and physical factors associated with telescopic handler overturning risks

Research Report (RR1083) – Risks to respiratory health in the grain industry

Union concern after offshore workers get a radiation dose

Offshore union Unite has called for a transparent investigation into an incident where rig workers were exposed to ionising radiation. The incident happened on EnQuest’s Thistle platform, off Shetland, last December. Rigging supervisor Steve Innes, from Sunderland, told the BBC he and fellow Wood Group contractors discovered they had been exposed to alpha radiation. EnQuest said “additional precautionary steps” had since been taken.

The men were working at Thistle, 125 miles (201 km) north east of Shetland, doing shutdown work with pipe equipment. An EnQuest spokesperson said: “EnQuest can confirm that, in December 2016, during planned shutdown activities on its Thistle platform, six personnel employed by Wood Group under a contract with EnQuest were removing a piece of pipework when they were exposed to low levels of NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material). The level of exposure was less than 1 per cent of the level at which it is reportable to the Health and Safety Executive however EnQuest advised the HSE of the matter at the time.”

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-794-1-april-2017-1#_Toc478647740

If you want to improve work safety, find a friend

A workplace may be seriously unhealthy, but it s frequently only budgets, deadlines and margins in the must-do column for senior management, a leading trade union safety educator has warned. Dave Smith, writing in the latest issue of Hazards magazine, warns a solitary union rep may have problems being heard, “particularly when the company board is more fixated on a healthy profit than a healthy workforce.”

To counter this, Smith says when it comes to organising around workplace health and safety, the key to success is recognising that unions are collective organisations. That means individual reps can’t do it all on their own, they need support. Echoing a mapping approach recommended in the TUC’s organising strategy, he notes: “My suggestion for new reps is to get a big piece of paper and draw a plan of the workplace divided into different departments... Next, ask yourself two simple questions. What are the issues? And do I have any friends?”

More information: https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/tuc-risks-794-1-april-2017-1#_Toc478647742

Event: Mental Health for Health and Safety Professionals Conference

11 May 2017, London, UK

Contact: Heather Beach | Email heather@healthy-working.com | https://billetto.co.uk/en/events/mental-health-for-health-and-safety-professionals

Event: AIChE’s 62nd Annual Safety in Ammonia Plants and Related Facilities Symposium

10-14 September 2017, New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge

A century of ammonia synthesis technology – with an emphasis on continual progress in ammonia plant safety – is the theme of AIChE’s 62nd Annual Safety in Ammonia Plants and Related Facilities Symposium. Experts from around the world will discuss the latest advances related to the safe production.

Contact: www.aiche.org/conferences/annual-safety-ammonia-plants-and-related-facilities-symposium/2017

Event: The Future of Blue-Light Services – Assessing the Policing and Crime Act and Embedding Collaboration in Every Area

18 July 2017, Central London

Over recent years we have witnessed a significant shift in the risks and demands facing our emergency services. In the decade leading up to 2013, incidents requiring the attendance of fire and rescue services dropped 40% whilst police recorded crime underwent a similarly marked decline. Ambulance services conversely find themselves under unprecedented strain, with the Department of Health response time target of reaching 75% of category A calls within 8 minutes being missed every month since January 2014. Indeed, in March 2016 only 66.5% of category A calls were reached within this time.

In response to the growing pressures on blue-light services, collaboration between each of the services has been increasingly encouraged in order to alleviate pressures on individual departments. The Policing and Crime Act 2017 identifies collaboration as a priority for blue-light Services mainly by allowing Police and Crime Commissioners to take control of Fire and Rescue Authorities. Collaboration is an integral part of producing strong blue-light services but there have been doubts as to whether amalgamating different sectors will be beneficial to the service. With many PCC’s such as South Yorkshire and Surrey already considering joining both departments, this symposium will offer an opportunity to consider the potential impact this may have on blue-light services.

Moreover, it is clear that emergency services still face critical challenges undertaking the transformation demanded by Government, and in continuing to ensure public safety and health. Average response times to both dwelling and building fires increased in 2015/16, whilst we have seen an increase in fire deaths over the last year. Equally, recent terrorist attacks in Europe have sharpened the public’s focus upon the police forces’ ability to deal with a similar incident in the UK.

In light of these recent political developments, this symposium provides a timely opportunity for local authorities, ambulance trusts, police organisations and fire and rescue services to discuss how they can respond to these statutory changes and work together in the interests of improving effectiveness, efficiency and public safety. The event will also provide all relevant partners with the opportunity to consider the implications of the UK’s decision to leave the EU upon the delivery of blue-light services.

Event Details: www.publicpolicyexchange.co.uk/events/HG18-PPE