Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd

News from around the World

News Archive

October 2015

Contents
  1. News from Poland: New Centre for Research and Development on Work Processes and Safety Engineering (Tech-Safe-Bio), CIOP-PIB, Warsaw
  2. Association for Specialist Fire Protection (ASFP) has launched a new website
  3. International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) is holding two Regional Conferences in November 2015
  4. The storage of flammable liquids in tanks
  5. European Union stakeholders debate results of the EP pilot project “Safer and healthier work at any age”
  6. The 2015 Healthy Workplaces Summit – Managing workplace stress
  7. UK NHS will invest £5 million in health initiatives to improve staff health and wellbeing
  8. British Occupational Hygiene Society (BOHS) research evidences the main occupational factors causing disability and death
  9. 2016 International Safety Awards – invitation to international organisations
  10. US NIOSH Partnership Focuses on Reaching Spanish-speaking Immigrant Workers with Occupational Safety and Health Information
  11. Over 50s most vulnerable to avoidable fire deaths London Fire Brigade warns
  12. Union advice can be crucial to support workers with cancer
  13. New UK regulations will help protect children from smoking
  14. RoSPA welcomes IKEA’s blind-cord promise to save children’s lives
  15. World Day for Decent Work: “End Corporate Greed”
  16. Every 9 Minutes, Someone in the World Dies of Rabies
  17. ASH welcomes UK Government plans for prisons to go smokefree
  18. Workshop on Assessment of Air Quality Related to Hydraulic Fracturing Activities
  19. ECHA News
  20. IOSH occupational health event highlights positives for workers and businesses
  21. Dr. John Howard Reappointed as Director of the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Administrator of the World Trade Center Health Program
  22. News from Poland: JOSE – the International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics
  23. Memory and Healthy Aging
  24. UK TUC issues guidance for supporting staff with cancer at work
  25. Ergonomics Village 2015, the meeting point for ergonomics and wellness at work
  26. USA: Common solvent is killing people
  27. Event: ASTM Michael E. Beard Conference – Asbestos and Fibrous Minerals Analysis and Research

News from Poland: New Centre for Research and Development on Work Processes and Safety Engineering (Tech-Safe-Bio), CIOP-PIB, Warsaw

New Centre for Research and Development on Work Processes and Safety Engineering (Tech-Safe-Bio), CIOP-PIB, Warsaw

The objective of the Tech-Safe-Bio project was to construct the infrastructure and to equip the scientific laboratories group functioning in the structure of the Central Institute for Labour Protection – National Research Institute CIOP-PIB with modern research equipment. This action was necessary to create the potential for high quality advanced research in line with strategic national and European research programmes.

The opening ceremony of new research laboratories of the Central Institute for Labour Protection-National Research Institute took place on 7 October 2015 in Warsaw, Poland.

These new State-of-the-art laboratories are able to conduct interdisciplinary research aimed at protection of health and safety of workers in the following topic areas:

The Tech-Safe-Bio laboratories significantly broaden the scope of research and development work related to protection of the workforce – especially for older people and the disabled and in working and living environments. The laboratories give new impetus to the Institute’s development, including research staff, and intensify cooperation with other research and development entities.

High-tech research equipment is used for high quality advanced research work, e.g. designing and development of innovative methods and technical solutions. These are aimed at improvement of occupational safety in different sectors of economy under thematic priority areas of Info, Tech and Bio that comply with strategic research programmes of the European Technology Platform on Industrial Safety as well as thematic priorities of the European research area.

Dr Danuta Koradecka is Director of CIOP – Central Institute for Labour Protection / National Research Institute.

www.ciop.pl

Association for Specialist Fire Protection (ASFP) has launched a new website

This features a contemporary design and improved navigation, aimed at improving the visitor experience to ensure they find the passive fire protection advice and information they need.

The newly updated site uses clear labelling to ensure that the visitor can quickly access the information they are looking for, whether this is the ASFP’s extensive range of free to download guidance documents and videos, access to events and training information, or news of ASFP and member activities.

The ASFP publications and video libraries offer in depth technical information with regard to built-in passive fire protection. Meanwhile, members can access a wealth of documents and meeting minutes through the extensive members’ area.

The site’s news section offers updates on all of the ASFP’s activities, as well as access to the ASFP e-bulletin which provides news from the Association and its members, while available seminars and training courses are detailed in the events section.

Visitors looking for tailored passive fire protection advice or wishing to locate an appropriate product or specialist contractor for their project can use the site’s member search facility to find the right product or contractor.

The new dynamic site can be viewed just as easily on mobile phones and tablets, allowing visitors to access information when on the move.

Marking the launch of the new site, ASFP CEO Wilf Butcher declared:

“Modern websites must offer a wide range of services to visitors, while at the same time ensuring they can find what they are looking for with ease, whether in the office or on the move.

“The ASFP’s new website offers a fresh design and improved navigation tools to help you to locate quickly exactly what you need. It provides easy access to an extensive range of passive fire protection guidance and technical guidance for visitors and members alike and I urge you to explore it.”

www.asfp.org.uk

International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) is holding two Regional Conferences in November 2015

The International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) is holding two Regional Conferences for members and their customers. Non-members are welcome to attend as well.

Do not forget to mark your calendars for these upcoming IPAF events that are complimentary to all registrants.

You will not want to miss an event near you. Sessions will address new design standards for manufacturers, OSHA requirements, and a general update from IPAF North America. Presenters from United Rentals and Terex Corporation – Genie Industries will join them.

4 November 2015
Pico Rivera (Los Angeles), CA
Hosted by United Rentals and includes facility tour.

4 December 2015
Lithonia (Atlanta, GA)
BBQ Lunch hosted at MastClimbers, LLC

To register for these events visit: www.ipaf.org/en/services/north-american-regional-conferences

Contact: IPAF | ++1 630-942-6583 | Stacey.Woldt@ipaf.org

The storage of flammable liquids in tanks

This guidance applies to above and below ground fixed bulk storage tanks. It applies to premises where flammable liquids are stored in individual tanks or groups of tanks. It may also be applied to portable or skid-mounted vessels with capacities in excess of 1000 litres.

It also gives guidance on the design, construction, operation and maintenance of installation used for the storage of flammable liquids in fixed and transportable tanks operating at or near atmospheric pressure.

It will help you assess the risks arising from the use of flammable liquids and decide how to control those risks.

The storage of flammable liquids in tanks
Health and Safety Executive, ISBN 9780717666072, HSG176 (Second edition), September 2015, 69 pages

www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg176.htm

European Union stakeholders debate results of the EP pilot project “Safer and healthier work at any age”

The European Parliament pilot project on the health and safety of older workers delegated thorough the European Commission to EU-OSHA back in 2013 is reaching its final stages. Project results were presented by EU-OSHA in a conference in Brussels on 22 September 2015, with a welcome by the MEP Ole Cristensen. OSH experts and representatives from the Commission and EU social partners had the opportunity to debate and validate the results, and provide input into the final analysis to be released by early 2016. The discussion sessions are arranged around the project’s main topics, such as Ageing, OSH and gender; OSH policies, strategies, programmes and actions; workplace practices and support for enterprises; and Rehabilitation and Return-to-Work systems and programmes.

The project’s findings and results will be made easily accessible through an online visualisation tool and the different reports and summaries will contribute to the objectives and messages of the “Healthy Workplaces for all ages” campaign that will be running in 2016-17.

Read more about the pilot project Safer and healthier work at any age – occupational safety and health in the context of an ageing workforce

Learn more about OSH management in the context of an ageing workforce

The 2015 Healthy Workplaces Summit – Managing workplace stress

This Summit brings together leading European experts and decision makers. They get together to exchange good practices and explore future strategies for managing stress and psychosocial risks in European enterprises.

The event takes place on 3 and 4 November 2015 in Bilbao, Spain and closes the 2-year Healthy Workplaces Campaign on ‘Managing stress and psychosocial risks at work’.

More about the summit

Healthy Workplaces Summit 2015 – Managing workplace stress

UK NHS will invest £5 million in health initiatives to improve staff health and wellbeing

Neal Stone, Deputy Chief Executive, British Safety Council highlights in Safety Management the economic and non-economic benefits of promoting good health interventions at work to improve employees’ health and organisation productivity by reducing absenteeism.

The cost of absenteeism to NHS equates to “some £2.4 billion a year”.

https://sm.britsafe.org/spend-save-you-know-it-makes-sense

British Occupational Hygiene Society (BOHS) research evidences the main occupational factors causing disability and death

A recently released report by BOHS points out that behavioural risk factors account for about 28% of years lost due to disability, followed by metabolic risks (19%) and occupational risks (5%). These factors are relevant having been directly related to socioeconomic determinants of health.

2016 International Safety Awards – invitation to international organisations

British Safety Council invite UK and international organisations of all sectors and sizes, to demonstrate their commitment to protect and improve workers’ health and safety, by applying for an International Safety Award.

The closing date is Monday, 8 February 2016.

US NIOSH Partnership Focuses on Reaching Spanish-speaking Immigrant Workers with Occupational Safety and Health Information

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015, September 15 to October 15, serves as a reminder that health equity in occupational safety and health is central to our nation’s overall health and safety.

In a partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs and its network of 50 consulates in the United States, NIOSH has developed a series of multimedia materials – Protéjase en el trabajo or Protect Yourself at Work.

These materials will be shared with lower-wage Spanish-speaking immigrant workers in the United States. The materials include four brochures, two posters, and five videos. They offer evidence-based information to raise awareness about potential occupational safety and health issues, and they encourage workers to seek help for work-related questions or concerns.

www.cdc.gov/niosh/enews/enewsV13N6.html

Over 50s most vulnerable to avoidable fire deaths London Fire Brigade warns

New figures recently released show that over 90 per cent of people who died in accidental house fires were over 50 years of age.

The statistics have been released that marked the start of Chief Fire Officers Associations (CFOA) home safety week which was aimed at reducing fires involving older people.

Firefighters across London held events with older people’s associations to highlight the risks and educating people about how they can stay safe from fire.

Of the 23 people who died in accidental fires last year only two were under 50 years of age. The figures also show that:

London Fire Brigade Community Safety Group Manager Mark Hazelton said:

“It is a highly distressing way for older people’s lives to be ended by fire and we’re working hard to identify those most at risk and give them a lifesaving home fire safety visit.

“In a high number of cases, these frail people were regularly receiving care services and support in their home. The Brigade is committed to working with the agencies that provide this care so that they can better recognise the risk to which these people are exposed and design solutions to respond to their particular circumstances.”

We’re calling for closer working between the care and fire profession

Fire chiefs are asking care staff to get in touch with their local fire and rescue service if they notice any of the vital early warning signs, in order to prevent a fire from happening.

Care workers are often the first to see the tell tale signs like burn marks from cigarettes on clothes or carpets, or a smoke alarm that has run out of battery power.

Home fire safety visit

In 2014/2015, LFB visited 87,000 homes in London to undertake home fire safety visits. Past research shows that vulnerable people are 18 times less likely to have a fire if they receive a visit from firefighters in their home.

Union advice can be crucial to support workers with cancer

To coincide with Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which began last week and lasts throughout October, the UK based TUC has issued guidance for union representatives, employees, line managers and employers for how best to support colleagues with cancer at work.

More than 700,000 people of working age are living with cancer across the UK. As survival rates improve and people retire later, many people will continue to work after – or even during – their treatment for cancer.

The TUC believes that getting back to work at the right time and with the right support can provide psychological and financial benefits to workers with cancer. However, some employers struggle to provide the right support for their staff and this is where guidance from unions can be crucial.

The TUC advice – put together by TUC Education and Macmillan Cancer Support – says:

  1. Confidentiality. Trust, honesty and confidentiality are vital in supporting staff with cancer. Employees who talk to their bosses about their illness and difficulties in coping with work must not be penalised, downgraded or even made redundant as a result.
  2. Flexibility. Everyone with cancer is classed as disabled under the Equality Act, so employers need to make reasonable adjustments to a member of staff’s working arrangements when they are diagnosed and treated for cancer. Union reps can help employers with changes that might include allowing an employee time off to attend doctors’ appointments, allowing more flexibility in working hours, allowing extra breaks to help cope with tiredness, allowing more working from home and allowing a phased return to work after extended sick leave.
  3. Keeping in touch. Union reps should keep in touch with sick employees while they are off as well as when they are in the workplace to help make sure they still feel involved, valued and part of the team, to ensure early referral for medical checks, to be alert to disability issues and to involve all levels of management in rehabilitation – including line managers and HR staff.
  4. Return to work. When it is time for a member of staff to return to work there should be a clear policy in place – that is not linked with any disciplinary procedure – and the advice of the employee’s GP or medical specialist should be followed. A range of options should be open to the returning staff member and where appropriate there should be alterations of work stations, retraining offered, changes to working times and patterns, and a review of transport arrangements to and from work.
  5. Wider support. Union reps can also work with staff who will have to become carers for partners, children or relatives who have been diagnosed with cancer, and help employees ensure they are getting all the financial support they are entitled to including statutory sick pay, carer’s allowance, housing benefit and tax credits. Unions can also help negotiate paid carers’ leave.

People with cancer can experience considerable prejudice from both managers and colleagues and may hide aspects of their illness from bosses. There is enormous scope for union reps to ensure employers support their staff effectively and everyone should be in a trade union to get their voice heard and their interests represented at work.

www.unionlearn.org.uk/publications/cancer-workplace-workbook-union-representatives

New UK regulations will help protect children from smoking

A raft of new regulations to protect the health of young people and curb youth smoking will enter into force in England and Wales on 1 October 2015. In addition to the legislation on behalf of young people – a practice known as proxy purchasing rule will also apply to electronic cigarettes. A separate regulation will make it illegal for young people under the age of 18 to buy e-cigarettes.

Research commissioned by ASH reveals that the law prohibiting ban on smoking in cars with children younger than 18 years of age is supported by 85% of adults in England and is also supported by three quarters (74%) of smokers.

Deborah Arnott, Chief Executive of health charity ASH said:

“Making it illegal to smoke in cars with children is supported by the vast majority of adults, including smokers, who recognise the harm caused by secondhand smoke. But despite the level of public support some adults still smoke in front of children. We hope the legislation will make them realise they should stop not just in their cars but also in their homes.”

“We also welcome the law prohibiting the sale of e-cigarettes to children which will reinforce the message that these products are intended for adult smokers who want to cut down or quit smoking.”

The new regulations follow the legislation prohibiting the display of tobacco products at the point of sale which was fully implemented in April this year. Next year will see the introduction of standardised (plain) tobacco packaging and implementation of the revised EU Tobacco Products Directive which will require large pictorial health warnings on both the front and back of cigarette packs.

www.ash.org.uk/media-room/press-releases/:new-regulations-will-help-protect-children-from-smoking

RoSPA welcomes IKEA’s blind-cord promise to save children’s lives

The UK’s family safety charity has welcomed news that IKEA is to stop selling blinds with cords in a bid to save children’s lives.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) has hailed the move by the furniture giant as an important step forward in improving child safety.

The charity has been working across the UK to raise awareness about the dangers of looped cords for several years and hopes other blind retailers will take the opportunity to implement a similar change.

RoSPA’s own research shows that at least 27 toddlers have been killed by blind cords and chains in the UK between 1999 and 2014, of which around half have occurred since 2010.

Sheila Merrill, RoSPA’s public health adviser, said: “This is fantastic news. Not only will it help to save many lives but it is an important step forward for the blind cord industry. It is encouraging to see such a well-known furniture retailer taking the necessary steps to help prevent further tragedies.

“Any move that reduces the risk to children is a move in the right direction. Too many lives have been needlessly affected by the dangers of looped blind cords, which is why we called upon the blind industry to take voluntary action to reduce the risk.

“We hope that other major retail stores will make the same promise as IKEA to stop selling window blinds with cords.”

Research indicates that most accidental deaths involving blind cords happen in the bedroom to children between 16 months and 36 months old, with the majority (more than half) happening at about 23 months.

To reduce the risk posed by looped blind cords, RoSPA’s advice is:

RoSPA has distributed hundreds of thousands of safety packs containing an advice leaflet and a cleat – a small plastic device that is fitted to the side of the window for the operating cord to be wrapped around – to families and carers of young children.

Anyone wanting more information about blind cord safety should visit www.rospa.com/campaigns-fundraising/current/blind-cord

World Day for Decent Work: “End Corporate Greed”

Trade unions around the world are once again mobilised on 7 October 2015, the World Day for Decent Work, under the banner “End Corporate Greed”, with activities stretching from Japan to Ecuador and South Africa to Russia. Activities in 33 countries have already been registered on the special website www.2015.wddw.org and many more will be uploaded.

As in the past, a wide range of different types of events are planned. Brussels, the “Capital of Europe”, will come to a standstill with a huge demonstration organised by the Belgian trade unions against austerity, while unions from the manufacturing sector will hold events across the globe to demand an end to precarious work, organised by Global Union Federation IndustriALL.

Many trade unions will be on the streets to make personal contact with rush-hour commuters while others will be holding press conferences, public events and workplace meetings. As it prepares for an October 10 mobilisation against the TTIP and CETA trade deals, Germany’s trade union centre DGB is also holding a conference to press for “Fair Play for Workers in Mega Sports Events” as pressure mounts for reform of FIFA and an end to exploitation of the workers who build and deliver the world’s major sports competitions.

“Once again the voice of working people will be heard around the globe on the World Day for Decent Work. The global focus this year is on ending corporate greed, eliminating precarious work and formalising informal jobs, as well as living minimum wages. We need to transform the exploitative supply chain model which robs workers while filling the coffers of multinational companies, many of which are culpable of the most egregious exploitation including the use of modern slavery. The trade union movement stands with the most exploited and vulnerable in the global economy, and on this day, the World Day for Decent Work, we will show our determination to build a better world for working families and for the generations to come,” said ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow.

Video statement by Sharan Burrow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgwsTOXfJGo

Every 9 Minutes, Someone in the World Dies of Rabies

A human death from rabies is a tragic but rare thing in the United States and most developed nations. It’s just as tragic but sadly common in parts of the world where some 3 billion people are at risk of being bitten by a rabid dog. More than 59,000 people die of rabies each year because they cannot get the care they need. That’s about 1 person dying of rabies every 9 minutes.

Most of these deaths are in Africa and Asia, and nearly half of the victims are children under the age of 15. Many of these lives can be saved if bite victims and healthcare providers know what to do and have what they need – rabies vaccine and immunoglobulin.

“Measures to prevent rabies in people are simple: wash the wound right after you are bitten and get follow-up care and vaccination immediately,” said Ryan Wallace, veterinary epidemiologist with CDC. “However, the primary method of prevention, and the more cost-effective intervention in the fight against rabies, is vaccination of domestic pets, particularly dogs.”

Today is World Rabies Day, an opportunity for people around the world to learn more about the impact that rabies has on people and animals and what each of us can do to put the world on the path toward eliminating rabies. This year’s theme is End Rabies Together, which challenges individuals and organizations to pull together to end the needless suffering and deaths caused by this preventable disease.

The fact that so few people in the United States and other developed nations get rabies shows that the disease can be controlled. Canine rabies has been eliminated in the United States, thanks to routine dog vaccinations and licensing and better control of stray dogs. Since the control of canine rabies in the United States, it has now been recognized that numerous wild animals can be infected with this disease. For that reason, people still must remain aware of the risk of rabies and seek medical care when exposed to wildlife and unusually acting animals.

www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2015/p0928-rabies.html

ASH welcomes UK Government plans for prisons to go smokefree

Following publication today of air quality data showing significant levels of harmful tobacco smoke in the air in prisons, ASH welcomes the Government’s commitment to making prisons in England and Wales smokefree.

From January 2016 prisons in Wales will become smokefree. This will be followed by a cluster of prisons in the southwest of England which will be early adopters of the smokefree policy. The remainder of the prison estate will subsequently become smokefree although the timing of this is still to be determined.

Commenting on the new policy Deborah Arnott, Chief Executive of health charity ASH said:

“In light of the high levels of tobacco smoke in prisons we are pleased that prisons in England and Wales will finally be going smokefree, something ASH has been calling for since 2005. However, the plan only covers England and Wales, and we urge prison authorities in Scotland and Northern Ireland to follow suit. Breathing in secondhand smoke increases the risk of lung cancer, heart disease and respiratory disorders, putting the health of both inmates and staff at risk. Prison authorities have a duty of care to protect the health of both staff and inmates, and prohibiting smoking will substantially improve their health and wellbeing.”

Smokefree policies have been successfully introduced in a number of other jurisdictions, notably in New Zealand, Australia, Canada and federal prisons of the United States. The Isle of Man and Guernsey prisons, as well as all facilities for juvenile offenders, are already smokefree.

The smokefree policy has already been tested and upheld in a Court of Appeal ruling against a legal challenge to the law which banned smoking in psychiatric units. In a case brought on behalf of patients at Rampton high security hospital who claimed that the smoking ban infringed their human rights, the Court of Appeal ruled that there was “no legal right to smoke” under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The Court also ruled that there was a duty of care to staff and that it was required to take “all reasonable precautions” to protect staff from that risk. Although this judgement concerned a hospital rather than a prison, the same principle as regards exposure to secondhand smoke applies.

Prisoners will be given support to help them quit and those who want to carry on using nicotine will be able to buy electronic cigarettes in prison shops.

www.ash.org.uk/media-room/press-releases/:ash-welcomes-government-plans-for-prisons-to-go-smokefree

27 January 2016, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, USA

Objective

ASTM International Subcommittee D18.26 previously organized several workshops on various issues related to hydraulic fracturing activities, some of which were co-sponsored by related ASTM committees. To further the discussion on this important topic, D18.26 and Committee D22 on Air Quality are jointly sponsoring a half-day workshop on air quality issues related to hydraulic fracturing activities. The workshop seeks to focus on air quality issues potentially affecting the general public, and potential impacts to workers at those sites. These impacts include respirable silica, benzene and other organics, and nitrogen oxides.

Topic Areas

The workshop will focus on identification of air quality issues related to hydraulic fracturing activities. This Call for Presentations solicits speakers that will contribute to:

Each presentation will be limited to 20 minutes, with 10 minutes for discussion.

How to submit an abstract

Please email your title and abstract (limit 300 words) by October 30, 2015 to Mike Brisson, D22 Chairman, at mike.brisson@srs.gov.

Technical chair contact information

Questions about the workshop can be directed to the Workshop Chairmen: Mike Brisson, at mike.brisson@srs.gov, or Jeff Hale, D18.26 Chairman, at jhale@kleinfelder.com

ECHA News

ECHA Biocidal Products Committee adopts seven opinions

The European Chemicals Agency Biocidal Products Committee (BPC) met for the twelfth time from 30 September to 1 October 2015. The adopted six opinions are for peracetic acid used in biocidal products, for example as disinfectants and in-can preservatives. The BPC also adopted one opinion in line with Article 75(1)(g) on sulfuryl fluoride. Four other opinions are expected to be adopted following written consultation.

Stay up-to-date with upcoming ECHA biocides deadlines

The ‘Upcoming deadlines’ page has been updated on 1 October 2015 with new notifications possibilities due to redefinitions and the withdrawal of all former participants.

The Article 95 list of active biocidal substance and product suppliers updated

ECHA advises that companies making biocidal products available on the market have to ensure that either their substance, product suppliers or themselves are included in the Article 95 list. Updated list of them is now available.

ECHA – New consultations for harmonised classification and labelling launched

ECHA has launched public consultations on the harmonised classification and labelling proposals for 1,2-dihydroxybenzene; pyrocatechol (EC 204-427-5) and sodium hypochlorite, solution ... % Cl active (EC 231-668-3).

Pyrocatechol is a major intermediate for synthesis of molecules for agrochemical use. It is an intermediate for perfumes, cosmetics and aromas. It is also used in various areas such as: anticorrosion agent; antioxidant for rubber, olefins and polyofins, polyurethanes; therapeutic agent; bonding agents; tanning agent, synthetic tannins or photography; catalysts.

Sodium hypochlorite is used mainly in chemical synthesis, for bleaching, for cleaning, disinfection and sanitation in household, for municipal water and sewage disinfection. It is also approved as an active substance in plant protection products in the EU.

The final date for submitting comments for both substances is 23 November 2015.

ECHA Registry of Intentions updated

On 2 October 2015, Denmark submitted an Annex XV restriction dossier on (3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluorooctyl)silanetriol and any of its mono-, di- or tri-O-(alkyl) derivatives.

Germany plans to submit a Restriction dossier on diisocyanates. The expected submission date is on 15 July 2016.

More information: https://echa.europa.eu/view-article/-/journal_content/title/echa-e-news-7-october-2015

IOSH occupational health event highlights positives for workers and businesses

Managing occupational health correctly can help organisations become more profitable and operationally effective.

That was the message given during a recent seminar hosted by the East Midlands Branch of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH).

Experts explained how properly thought-out health and wellbeing programmes can help keep staff safe and fit for work, while also highlighting the importance of protecting workers from being exposed to causes of work-related diseases.

Chartered IOSH member Michelle Twigg, of Park Health & Safety Partnership, said good occupational health practices can benefit companies and projects, whatever their size.

She cited the London 2012 Olympic Village construction project – which was completed ahead of schedule, on budget and without a single work-related death – as an example of how well researched and targeted occupational health initiatives can have a positive impact on workers’ safety and wellbeing.

Michelle said: “When it comes to safety we have made great headway in reducing fatalities and accidents, but we are losing more people every year through occupational diseases than through safety issues and the balance needs to be redressed.

“It is about managing health like safety, knowing what risks and hazards are around and putting control regimes in place.”

She added: “Health is deliverable, cost effective and does give a return on the bottom line. If you manage health properly you will be a profitable and effective organisation.”

IOSH President Elect, Dr Karen McDonnell, addressed the seminar about the Institution’s No Time to Lose campaign, and its aim to “break the vicious cycle of occupational cancer”.

The campaign is raising awareness and offering practical advice around five common work-related risk factors associated with cancer registrations and deaths – diesel engine exhaust emissions, solar radiation, asbestos, silica dust and shift work.

Karen said: “Work cancer is the fifth biggest cause of cancer behind lifestyle choices like smoking or diet. Occupation-attributable cancer deaths also account for five per cent of all cancer deaths.

“There are measures which can be put in place to tackle these issues. Hopefully through No Time to Lose we can assist you in addressing any issues that may affect your organisations.”

The seminar, which took place at The Riverside Centre, Derby, on Thursday 1 October, also featured Chartered occupational hygienist Chris Keen. He highlighted occupational hygiene society BOHS’s Breathe Freely campaign to tackle work-related lung disease in the construction sector.

Andrew Harris of Leicestershire-based social enterprise, The Fit for Work Team, also spoke about making workplace wellbeing “the norm” within an organisation.

He said: “When it comes to wellbeing programmes you have to identify and prioritise the health needs of staff.

“What is the point of delivering smoking cessation schemes if no-one smokes or they do, but don’t want to give up? Implementing targeted, employee-driven initiatives is the only way that you are going to get engagement and sustainability.”

IOSH East Midlands Branch intends to hold further seminars on hot topics within occupational safety and health elsewhere in the region.

Branch Chair Colin Jenkinson said: “We wanted to put together a programme that really looked at some of the challenges faced by safety and health professionals around occupational disease.

“Failure to address these challenges can result in workers suffering illnesses which, at their worst, can be life-threatening or life-altering. Where the link between ill health and work is established, however, it is possible to prevent illnesses and disease from occurring.”

Dr. John Howard Reappointed as Director of the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Administrator of the World Trade Center Health Program

On 1 October 2015 John Howard, M.D. was reappointed as the director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and as Administrator of the World Trade Center Health Program, effective September 3, 2015. Dr. Howard is the sixth director of NIOSH and, with this reappointment, now the longest serving in the role.

As one of the nation’s leaders in occupational health and worker safety, Dr. Howard has worked with scientists, medical professionals, workers and labour groups, and business leaders to effectively lead investigations into new and potential health hazards, and to address workplace health and safety concerns. His dedication and passion to ensuring safe and healthy workplaces will lead NIOSH into the future as the organization adapts to the ever-evolving nature of work.

He first served as NIOSH director from 2002 through 2008, and again from 2009 to the present. Bringing with him a wealth of administrative experience from his service in both state and federal governments and a long history of personal dedication and professional achievement to the field of occupational safety and health, Dr. Howard has ably led NIOSH and the WTC Health Program in a time of unprecedented challenges and opportunities.

Dr. Howard is board-certified in internal medicine, legal medicine, and occupational medicine. He is also admitted to the practice of medicine and law in the state of California and in the District of Columbia, and he is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court bar. He has written numerous articles on occupational health, law and policy, and serves as a professorial lecturer in environmental and occupational health in the Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Howard received a doctor of medicine degree from the Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University of Chicago, a master of public health degree from the Harvard University School of Public Health, a doctor of law degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a master of law degree in administrative law and economic regulation from George Washington University.

In the years to come, Dr. Howard will launch the 3rd Decade of the National Occupational Research Agenda – a public-private partnership – now in its 20th year; ensure that NIOSH conducts cutting-edge research to address both persisting and emerging worker injury and illness risks in the 21st century; and support NIOSH’s efforts to move research findings into practice for the betterment of all workers.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., it has facilities in Atlanta, GA; Morgantown, W.VA.; Pittsburgh, PA.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Spokane, Wash; Denver, Colo., and Anchorage, Alaska.

For more information about NIOSH visit www.cdc.gov/niosh

News from Poland: JOSE – the International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics

This long established scientific journal, edited and published in English by the Central Institute for Labour Protection – National Research Institute (CIOP-PIB) in Warsaw, Poland is primarily devoted to original articles of significance in occupational safety and ergonomics.

The interdisciplinary character of JOSE allows for articles from diverse fields to be considered for publication. Their relevance to occupational safety and ergonomics and the scientific merit are primary criteria for publishing. JOSE is a peer-reviewed journal; however, the final decision regarding acceptance, revision or rejection of manuscripts rests with the Editors.

Since 2015 the very well known international publisher – Taylor & Francis is the new publisher of JOSE.

The journal is available on Taylor & Francis Online: www.tandfonline.com/loi/tose20

You can also find it on the portal of CIOP-PIB

The ISSN number of JOSE is: 1080-3548 (Print), 2376-9130 (Online)

Memory and Healthy Aging

Some declines in cognition and memory with age are normal, but sometimes they can signal problems. Learn the signs and symptoms of dementia and cognitive impairments so you can help the older adults in your life seek treatment at the right time.

September 2015 in the USA is Healthy Aging Month, a great time to learn the signs and symptoms associated with dementia and cognitive impairments. Physical activity, social engagement, and a healthy diet help prevent chronic conditions and increase the longevity and quality of life of older adults, but despite engaging in these healthy activities, some adults may develop memory loss or dementia. Some declines in memory are a normal part of aging, but sometimes they can signal a problem. Learn how to tell the difference.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/features/memory-healthy-aging

UK TUC issues guidance for supporting staff with cancer at work

To coincide with Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which began on 1 October 2015 and lasts throughout October, the UK Trades Union Congress (TUC) has issued guidance for union representatives, employees, line managers and employers for how best to support colleagues with cancer at work.

More than 700,000 people of working age are living with cancer across the UK. As survival rates improve and people retire later, many people will continue to work after – or even during – their treatment for cancer.

The TUC believes that getting back to work at the right time and with the right support can provide psychological and financial benefits to workers with cancer. However, some employers struggle to provide the right support for their staff and this is where guidance from unions can be crucial.

For full report see Cancer in the Workplace: A workbook for union representatives.

The materials were originally developed by Macmillan Cancer Support and TUC Education and since then hundreds of workplace reps, safety reps and union tutors have used them to consider how they can support people affected by cancer in the workplace.

Ergonomics Village 2015, the meeting point for ergonomics and wellness at work

27-30 October 2015

Come and discover and try industrial and tertiary furniture, equipment and services that your customers are expecting and that will allow you to satisfy them.

Come and discover solutions that will allow you to improve your industrial and tertiary workstations.

Initiated by Ergonoma Journal (10th year) European quarterly magazine, a bilingual English / French, whose motto is “Men behind the machines”, every two years, and only in Dusseldorf, as part of A+A, the No. 1 tradeshow for health and safety at work (in 2013, 63,000 visitors from 69 countries), the Ergonomics Village in the heart of Hall 10, dedicated to ergonomics, health and wellness at work, is the European and international meeting point not to be missed, to discover and try solutions to improve and manage workstations.

From tertiary to industry, the exhibitors, distributors and manufacturers offer for 4 days, materials, processes and training, fully in line with the health of the man at work.

Fighting against TMS, improving physical handicap situations, giving the keys to end and “evacuating” psychosocial risks, that have serious consequences for all employees of communities, as well as the private sector.

All the participants in the “Ergonomics Village” will help you to better understand the impact of technological change on the workstations, by offering tools and concepts for qualitative optimization of health prevention at workstations.

How to manage acoustics, lighting, flooring, adaptability of equipment, furniture and working tool. How to structure space: developing collaborative spaces or individual intense concentration and relaxation areas.

How to prioritize responsible management in compliance with the environment on the workplace. A unique opportunity to meet in DUSSELDORF ergonomists, trainers, physicians, prevention specialists, manufacturers, architects and work furniture designers.

This “Ergonomics Village” space will allow visitors to find solutions to deal with the problems posed by “hard working conditions”, whether physical or moral.

Not to be missed because the Ergonomics Village in Dusseldorf is only held every two years (the next in 2017).

More about Ergonomics Village and A+A 2015: www.aplusa-online.com

USA: Common solvent is killing people

Methylene chloride, a powerful solvent whose use is heavily restricted in Europe, remains widely used and poorly regulated in the US – and is continuing to kill as a result. The solvent is common in paint strippers, widely available products with labels that warn of cancer risks but do not make clear the possibility of rapid death.

In areas where the fumes can concentrate, workers and consumers risk asphyxiation or a heart attack while performing seemingly routine tasks. That hazard prompted the European Union to pull methylene chloride paint strippers from general use in 2011. However a Center for Public Integrity (CPI) investigation found US regulators failed to follow suit – with deadly consequences for workers and consumers.

“People have died, it poses this cancer threat… and everybody knows it’s a bad chemical, and yet nobody does anything,” said Katy Wolf, who recommends safer alternatives to toxic chemicals as director of the non-profit Institute for Research and Technical Assistance (IRTA) in California. “It’s appalling and irresponsible.”

She said an alternative containing benzyl alcohol is a reasonably effective replacement for commercial and consumer furniture stripping because it loosens all the same coatings for approximately the same overall cost. It doesn’t do so as quickly as methylene chloride – also known as dichloromethane – in some cases. But it doesn’t have the expense of methylene chloride’s OSHA-required protections, she noted.

https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-issues/health-and-safety/risks-newsletter/risks-2015/tuc-risks-721-26-september-2015-0#_Toc430853961

Event: ASTM Michael E. Beard Conference – Asbestos and Fibrous Minerals Analysis and Research

28-29 January 2016, Grand Hyatt San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA

The ASTM Johnson Asbestos Conferences have served as a forum for the discussion of asbestos issues approximately every third summer from 1986 to 2014. These conferences have been a major contributor to the advancement and understanding of asbestos in a number of areas including analysis, quality assurance, methods development, regulations, and monitoring technology. Unfortunately, there are members of the asbestos analytical community who are not able to attend a summer conference because that tends to be a very busy time for them. As a solution, the Michael E. Beard Conference was established as an ‘interim’ ASTM D22 Conference halfway between the triennial summer Johnson Conferences.

Registration information and the scheduled program are available at www.astm.org/D22MBReg