Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd

News from around the World

News Archive

September 2012

Contents
  1. Office work can really harm you
  2. What information do you really need to do your job safely and healthily?
  3. International Symposium on the challenges of Workplace Injury Prevention through Financial Incentives
  4. RoSPA Occupational Safety and Health Congress 2012
  5. Managing and working with asbestos: Advice for those with duties under asbestos regulations
  6. Interactive Driving Systems encourages you to participate at the UK National Fork Lift Truck Safety Conference 2012
  7. Happy 90th birthday, Professor Trevor Kletz
  8. Are we getting too old to afford social security?
  9. Pakistani factory fire highlights lack of workplace safety measures, says ILO
  10. Fire Prevention on Construction Sites: The Joint Code of Practice on the Protection from Fire of Construction Sites and Buildings Undergoing Renovation
  11. Never be without these one-stop shops to the latest Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information - user friendly, affordable and authoritative!
  12. RoSPA Scotland Congress to show firms how to protect their cash and kudos during tough times
  13. FABIG event: 'Update on Fire and Explosion Guidance, Standards and Regulations' in Aberdeen, London and via webcast
  14. USA: Campaign to prevent falls in the construction sector
  15. United States and Australia acknowledge formaldehyde as carcinogenic to humans
  16. Health and safety in roof work, 4th edition
  17. UK: Rise in suicides blamed on impact of recession
  18. NEBOSH to attend inaugural OSH India event
  19. Report from Canada: Preventing Violence among Employees of the Same Work Organisation - Evaluation of a Participatory Intervention
  20. Ireland's guidance on Health and Safety at Work in Residential Care Facilities
  21. Ensuring Best Practice for Passive Fire Protection in Buildings
  22. Preventing or controlling ill health from animal contact at visitor attractions: Industry Code of Practice from Farming and Countryside Education (FACE)
  23. Tackling Violence against Retail Staff
  24. Recent European Union legislation
  25. The TUC Workplace manual: A practical handbook for union representatives
  26. Rail Human Factors around the World: Impacts on and of People for Successful Rail Operations
  27. Designing Safe Road Systems: A Human Factors Perspective
  28. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) Prevention Manual from Canada
  29. Health and Safety Report 2012: Oil and Gas UK
  30. Shale gas extraction in the UK: A review of hydraulic fracturing
  31. A model syllabus for the training of technicians involved in the examination, testing, maintenance and repair of petroleum road tankers, 2nd edition
  32. Guidelines for the management of coating for external corrosion protection

Office work can really harm you

Better workstations and posture are not delivering the anticipated benefits as computer-bound office workers creak under the strain of escalating workloads. A new study has found even good posture and ergonomic office equipment do not prevent back, neck, wrist and shoulder injuries and are failing to protect overburdened sedentary workers from a raised risk of heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

Researchers from the University of Sydney blamed the overall workplace environment for the poor health of office workers. Their survey of nearly 1,000 Australian workers across six government departments found about 85 per cent of people who spent more than eight hours a day working at a computer experienced neck pain.

The study, published in the journal Work, also found three quarters reported shoulder pain and 70 per cent reported lower back pain. Lead author Karin Griffiths commented: "I know the amount of money organisations are putting into improved workstations and ergonomics, and it's not that those changes aren't important." But she added: "The problem is nearly everything can be done at the desk now - communication, library research, file retrieval, even meetings. It doesn't matter how good the chair is, it is not going to address the health problem of what some researchers are calling 'chair disease'." Long hours of computer work may also contribute to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity, she said.

Karin Lindgren Griffiths and others. Prevalence and risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms with computer based work across occupations, Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, volume 42, number 4, pages 533-541, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-2012-1396

The Age

What information do you really need to do your job safely and healthily?

Want to know the latest fire, health, safety and environmental information without too much effort? Limited budget? Short of time? Not many experts around you? In this fast moving world it is essential to have quick access to validated, authoritative and constantly updated information collections. Much time is spent these days searching the Internet for validated and authoritative information often resulting in out-of-date sources being retrieved.

Then these Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information collections OSH UPDATE www.oshupdate.com and FIREINF www.fireinf.com brought together and maintained by information specialists are one sure way of getting good quality data.

As new research and new ways of working, with the attendant alterations in products, services and technology developments means that no-one, especially those responsible for fire, emergencies and preparedness in workplaces of all kinds, should be without the latest information.

These long established sources of information are offered by Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd from the UK and are used by organisations, universities and individuals worldwide.

Searchers should also be aware that the myth abounding in the world that "everything is published on the Internet and is free" is just NOT true!

Request a free of charge 15 day trial www.sheilapantry.com/interest and check out for yourselves.

International Symposium on the challenges of Workplace Injury Prevention through Financial Incentives

29-30 November 2012, Toronto, Canada

Does it work? Can it work? What are the alternatives?

In today's competitive global economy, financial incentives are often seen by governments as an effective way to encourage workplaces to invest in occupational health and safety (OHS). But how well do these financial incentives work, and how can they be implemented to work effectively?

This symposium will provide a forum for researchers, students, policy-makers, injured worker communities, employer organizations, worker organizations and other stakeholders to discuss the social, economic and policy implications of using financial incentives as a mechanism for preventing workplace injuries. This international, multidisciplinary event will present the latest research on the ideal and actual performance of financial incentives, grouped around these key themes:

What do we mean by "financial incentives"?

Financial incentives, for the purposes of this symposium, refer to system-level fiscal measures to encourage employers to invest efforts and resources in injury, illness and work disability prevention. Specific forms of financial incentives include (but are not limited to) experience rating of premiums for workers' compensation or state disability programs, and premium-setting modifications based on other employer characteristics such as health and safety certification or specific prevention investments.

This is in contrast to direct means of addressing OHS management, such as OHS regulation and its enforcement by state inspectors. Financial incentives are also used within regulatory enforcement, through penalties for non-compliance, for example. This symposium is not focusing on these direct incentives.

What are some specific financial incentive topics?

Financial incentives are involved in almost every aspect of OHS, from prevention strategies to return-to-work design. Almost every stakeholder deals with financial incentives: policy-makers help design them, employers integrate them into their business practices, and workers experience their impact in terms of their safety and well-being on the job.

Here are some issues that may prompt you to consider submitting an abstract:

One of the keynote speakers is David Walters - Professor at Cardiff University, editor of the international journal Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, member of the Institute of Occupational Safety and Health research committee.

All details of the above mentioned event are available at: www.iwh.on.ca/prevention-incentives-2012

RoSPA Occupational Safety and Health Congress 2012

Thistle City Barbican Hotel, London, UK, 22 November 2012

The UK Government has begun its quest to "reclaim health and safety for all", but the challenge of reform extends way beyond policy level.

Good health and safety saves lives, reduces injures, safeguards health and promotes business success - no one can disagree. But are you prepared to lead the way on safety change within your own organisation? How can health and safety effort be made even more effective? What action are other leaders taking, and how can we learn from them?

At the 2012 RoSPA Occupational Safety and Health Congress, nationally recognised speakers will help you answer key questions such as:

The Congress will provide excellent insight for Directors and senior managers, enabling them to fulfil their health and safety responsibilities and for the safety professionals who advise and support them.

Contact the RoSPA Events team | Tel: +44 (0)121 248 2089 | events@rospa.com | www.rospa.com/events

Managing and working with asbestos: Advice for those with duties under asbestos regulations

This information will be of particular interest to employers, asbestos contractors and others with duties under asbestos regulations, together with those workers currently at greatest risk from exposure to asbestos.

The importation, supply and use of all forms of asbestos are banned. However, many buildings, and some plant and equipment, still contain asbestos-containing materials (ACMs).

Before you start any work in a building that might contain asbestos (e.g. built or refurbished before the year 2000), you need to do the following:

1) Identify whether asbestos is present and determine its type and condition:

2) Carry out a risk assessment:

3) Decide if the work needs to be carried out by a licensed contractor

4) If the work is not licensable, decide if the work needs to be notified

5) Ensure those carrying out the work are suitably trained

For further information: www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/detail.htm

Interactive Driving Systems encourages you to participate at the UK National Fork Lift Truck Safety Conference 2012

The 10th National Fork Lift Truck Safety Conference will take place at Warwick University on Wednesday 26th September 2012. This year the Conference will concentrate on providing practical solutions to everyday problems - helping all users of fork lift trucks to operate more safely.

The annual event, which takes place during National Fork Lift Safety Week, provides an exceptionally cost-effective way of keeping up to date with the industry's best practice.

Topics covered will include:

To find more information about the conference and participate, see www.fork-truck.org.uk/safety-conference

Alternatively, call the FLTA offices on 01256 381441 or email: mail@fork-truck.org.uk

For more details about Virtual Risk Manager - Fork Lift Truck, please go to www.virtualriskmanager.net/flt

Happy 90th birthday, Professor Trevor Kletz

The Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries, September 2012, Volume 25, Issue 4, devoted the issue to celebrate the contributions made by Professor Trevor Kletz in making the world of work in the process industry a safer place. He held for many years a mirror to process industry. The mirror reflected what should be done to prevent major accidents. His 90th birthday is an excellent moment to look back to what has been achieved.

The September 2012 Issue includes an article by Trevor Kletz containing some of his personal thoughts.

www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09504230/25/5

Are we getting too old to afford social security?

With people living longer, more and more questions are being raised on the possible effects of the ageing of the population on labour markets and social security systems.

As people live longer and birth rates drop - especially in developed economies - there is increasing concern over the long-term sustainability of pension schemes.

The challenge is formidable: more pensioners mean pension schemes need more money to keep running, but, with fewer people joining the labour market, there is less money to fund pension schemes.

One recent example is Germany, which last year recorded the lowest birth rate for 40 years. Another typical case is Japan, which has the oldest population in the world with more than 22 per cent of people aged 65 and over. The working-age population in China is also expected to decline this decade.

According to the International Social Security Association (ISSA), the proportion of those aged 65 and over as a percentage of the working population will double in Europe over the next 40 years and will even triple in Asia.

"This trend has already led to a reform of pension systems, including increases in retirement ages in a number of countries like Poland, Turkey, Côte d'Ivoire, the Republic of Korea and Colombia," says Simon Brimblecombe, Project Coordinator, Policy Analysis and Research at the ISSA.

However, to be successful, pension reforms should be accompanied by employment and health-care measures - such as the possibility to work part time - targeted at older workers.

Rising health costs

Another focus of attention is the risk that health costs get out of hand. According to the OECD, the over-65 age group accounts for 40-50 per cent of health-care spending. The percentage is likely to rise as the ageing of the population accelerates. OECD countries are already spending almost 10 per cent of their GDP on health care.

Access to medical assistance and adequate social services are an essential part of social security systems. The ageing of the population is a challenge that is clearly mentioned in the ILO Recommendation on social protection floors that was adopted at this year's International Labour Conference.

"Among other improvements, it will be essential to consider ways in which to improve the social security systems in order to prevent certain illnesses connected with old age or to optimize their treatment, as this could simultaneously improve the well-being of older people and lead to a more rational use of resources," said ISSA Secretary General Hans-Horst Konkolewsky.

"This should include an increasing focus on proactive and preventive measures, such as safety at work, healthy eating and anti-tobacco campaigns, among others," he added.

Pakistani factory fire highlights lack of workplace safety measures, says ILO

More needs to be done to protect workers' safety and health, the ILO says, as Pakistan mourns the deaths of hundreds of workers in a garment factory fire in Karachi.

The International Labour Organization (ILO) has called for national action to protect workers' health and safety, following the deaths of at least 240 workers in a garment factory in Karachi, Pakistan on 12 September 2012.

Seiji Machida, Head of the ILO's Safework Programme in Geneva underlined the need for concrete action to prevent such tragedies. "We were shocked by the news we heard that well over 200 workers were killed in a factory fire today. Protection of workers' safety and health is a fundamental human right. We need to reinforce measures to protect workers' lives from hazards in the workplace. We would like to call for national action to improve the protection of all workers," he said.

According to media reports, many victims were trapped in a basement with no fire exits and locked doors. Most died from suffocation when the basement filled with smoke. Other workers on higher floors rushed to windows to escape but struggled to get out because metal bars blocked their way. Hours earlier, at least 25 people died in a shoe factory fire in the Pakistani city of Lahore.

Tragedies like these, said Machida, are all too common in the region. In 1993, 188 workers, mainly women, died in a toy factory in Thailand.

"Almost 20 years after the tragedy in Thailand, we still see similar disasters. The risk of death or injuries from fire hazards in the workplace, continue to be an important issue. I would like to call for the strengthening of legal and other supporting measures to improve workplace safety and health in all countries, particularly in developing countries. We call for action to realize Decent Work must be safe work for all."

The ILO office in Pakistan added, "We have been highlighting the importance of Safe Work in Pakistan at forums organized with government, employers and workers and encouraging a Labour Inspection regime that protects the workers."

The ILO has adopted more than 40 standards specifically dealing with occupational safety and health, as well as over 40 Codes of Practice. Nearly half of the ILO's instruments deal directly or indirectly with occupational safety and health issues.

Fire Prevention on Construction Sites: The Joint Code of Practice on the Protection from Fire of Construction Sites and Buildings Undergoing Renovation

This is a new edition of the document which brought about revolutionary improvements in fire safety on construction sites. Widely recognised and highly regarded, the document applies to activities carried out prior to and during the procurement, construction and design process. It is commonly referred to in insurance contracts and is recognised as "best practice".

Produced by the Construction Confederation; Fire Protection Association; Association of British Insurers; Chief Fire Officers Association; London Fire Brigade it covers: fire prevention; emergency services; construction sites; arson; flammable liquids; insurance; building renovation; fire extinguishers; waste materials; gas; hot work; vehicles and much more.

Fire Prevention on Construction Sites: The Joint Code of Practice on the Protection from Fire of Construction Sites and Buildings Undergoing Renovation

Construction Confederation; Fire Protection Association; Association of British Insurers; Chief Fire Officers Association; London Fire Brigade, Fire Protection Association, July 2012, 36 pages, 8th edition, ISBN 9781902790770.

www.thefpa.co.uk/shop

Never be without these one-stop shops to the latest Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information - user friendly, affordable and authoritative!

Want to know the latest fire, health, safety and environmental information without too much effort? Limited budget? Short of time? Not many experts around you?

In this fast moving world it is essential to have quick access to validated, authoritative and constantly updated information collections. Much time is spent these days searching the Internet for validated and authoritative information often resulting in out-of-date sources being retrieved.

Then these Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information collections www.oshupdate.com and www.fireinf.com brought together and maintained by information specialists are one sure way of getting good quality data.

As new research and new ways of working, with the attendant alterations in products, services and technology developments means that no-one, especially those responsible for fire, emergencies and preparedness in workplaces of all kinds, should be without the latest information.

These long established sources of information are offered by Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd from the UK and are used by organisations, universities and individuals worldwide.

Searchers should also be aware that the myth abounding in the world that "everything is published on the Internet and is free" is just NOT true!

Request a free of charge 15 day trial www.sheilapantry.com/interest and check out for yourselves.

RoSPA Scotland Congress to show firms how to protect their cash and kudos during tough times

The 18th annual RoSPA Scotland Occupational Safety and Health Congress, taking place on 19 September 2012, at the Hilton Glasgow Hotel, Glasgow, will explore how good safety practice can give Scottish firms crucial competitive advantage.

Places are still available for the event, which will focus on the challenges and opportunities presented by recession. The next day event is the RoSPA Occupational Health and Safety Awards.

Delegates will explore current and future health and safety issues in the wider context of budget cuts through a number of case studies and knowledge sharing with Scottish businesses.

Karen McDonnell, head of RoSPA Scotland, said: "This event provides a valuable opportunity to see how best practice in health and safety can create a competitive advantage for firms in a challenging economic climate.

"In 2011-12, 20 workers died in occupational accidents in Scotland. This was an increase on last year's all-time low of 15. Everyone should be able to work in safety, so it is important to continue to focus on accident and ill health prevention in the workplace.

"The congress will particularly help those whose job it is to communicate the business case for health and safety in their workplace, enabling them to identify opportunities for continuous improvement, even when times are tough."

The event, supported by educational partner Scottish Centre for Healthy Working Lives, will open with Fraser Allan, group head of health, safety and environment at construction firm CBES Ltd, discussing "Health, safety and business resilience - Where are we now?" He will examine how Scottish organisations have used health and safety to protect themselves from damaging costs and publicity.

A variety of case study reviews covering safety leadership, communication, and health and wellbeing will run throughout the day, with plenty of top tips and practical advice given by prominent Scottish health and safety professionals. The involvement of a major Scottish firm in the resounding success of the "Big Build" for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will also be examined, and its legacy explored.

To view the full programme and to book places, visit www.rospa.com/events or call the events hotline on 0121 248 2120.

FABIG event: 'Update on Fire and Explosion Guidance, Standards and Regulations' in Aberdeen, London and via webcast

12 and 13 September 2012

The meeting will cover "Update on Fire and Explosion Guidance, Standards and Regulations" and will be a half day event held on Wednesday the 12th of September 2012 in Aberdeen and on Thursday the 13th in London and via webcast (registering for the webcast also enables subsequent access to a video recording of the event for 2 weeks).

The event programme comprises the following presentations:

UK Industry Position on Proposed EU Regulation on Offshore Safety
Trisha O'Reilly and Robert Paterson - Oil & Gas UK
Revising Industry Guidelines on Risk-related Decision Making
David Piper - Petrofac
EFEF JIP Procedure for Quantitative Assessment and Management of Hydrocarbon Explosion and Fire Risks in Offshore Installations
J. K. Paik and B. J. Kim - PUSAN National University
Revised Guidance for Probabilistic Explosion Analysis (title to be confirmed)
Jan Pappas - Scandpower
ISO 19901-3 2010: Topsides structure, Accidental situations - Explosion
Robert Brewerton - Natabelle Technology
Development of a Fire Test Standard for Vessels
Paul Mather - Paul Mather Consultancy
Ian Bradley - AkzoNobel / International Paint

It is expected that the meeting will start with registration and lunch at 12.30 and that the presentations will take place between 13.30 and 17.20.

Members of most engineering institutions can count FABIG Technical Meetings as Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Attendance certificates are issued to delegates upon request.

You can find more information and register for the event online at the FABIG website at www.fabig.com/events. Attendance is free of charge for FABIG members and £350 + VAT per person for non members. For non members, the fee to attend the live webcast is £200 + VAT per person.

For more information regarding registration, please contact Lis Oliver by email at fabig@steel-sci.com or by phone at +44 (0) 1344 636 537.

USA: Campaign to prevent falls in the construction sector

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR) have been campaigning since May this year to prevent falls at small residential construction sites.

In the United States, falls continue to be the leading cause of work-related injury and deaths in construction. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2010 there were more than 10,000 construction workers in the private construction industry who were injured as a result of falling while working from heights on the job and another 255 workers were killed. Latino construction workers also bear a disproportionate amount of the burden, suffering a greater proportion of fatal falls compared to their non-Latino counterparts.

"Our industry has lost far too many people to fatal falls," said CPWR Executive Director Pete Stafford. "Based on national data we've collected over the years, we know that no matter how many construction fatalities there are in any given year, consistently one-third of the total are the result of fatal falls. Losing any worker to a preventable fall is simply unacceptable. That's why CPWR is proud to be a part of this effort to raise awareness of this problem and, hopefully, reduce deaths and injuries from falls on the job."

United States and Australia acknowledge formaldehyde as carcinogenic to humans

Safe Work Australia, a government statutory agency, has changed formaldehyde's carcinogen classification from category 3 (limited evidence of a carcinogenic effect) to category 2 (may cause cancer by inhalation), basing its decision on a 2006 assessment by the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (Nicnas).

This change in classification follows updates to formaldehyde's listing by other world agencies including the United States' National Toxicology Program, an interagency program of the Department of Health and Human Services, which named formaldehyde as a known human carcinogen in its 12th Report on Carcinogens. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has also classified formaldehyde as a human carcinogen (group 1).

Currently, formaldehyde is considered by the European regulations as a "suspected carcinogen", according to the criteria in the 2008 European CLP regulation on the classification and labelling of chemicals. In September 2010, on behalf of the French authorities, a proposal to revise formaldehyde's classification in order to place it in a more stringent category at European level was submitted to the European Chemical Agency (ECHA), the agency in charge of managing the technical, scientific and administrative aspects of the REACH regulation.

If formaldehyde were recognised at European level as a proven carcinogen to humans, it would be subject to stricter regulatory measures, in particular the obligation to set up stronger prevention measures for occupational use and primarily its substitution wherever possible.

Formaldehyde has come under increased public scrutiny in recent years and is commonly found in the indoor environment due to its use in construction materials, building furnishings and some consumer products. Formaldehyde can cause both short and long term health concerns.

Health and safety in roof work, 4th edition

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has produced this new, 4th edition of guidance for roof working which is a high-risk activity because it involves working at height, sometimes with fragile materials such as roof lights and asbestos cement roofing sheets. Aimed at directors and partners of companies who carry out roof work; clients of projects involving roof work; designers and specifiers of buildings and components; those involved in CDM (Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007); co-ordinators principal contractors for projects that include roof work; owners of buildings where roof work may take place; trade union safety representatives and employees' safety representatives.

This fourth edition of the construction industry guidance identifies the main causes of accidents and ill health in roof work and ways to prevent or control risks.

Health and safety in roof work
Health and Safety Executive (HSE), 4th edition, 2012, ISBN 9780717665273, Series HSG33

www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/priced/hsg33.pdf

UK: Rise in suicides blamed on impact of recession

More than 1,000 people in the UK may have killed themselves because of the impact on their lives of the economic recession, according to a new analysis. Suicides tend to rise in hard economic times, and there has been evidence of the numbers increasing in Greece and more recently in Italy as people have lost their jobs and struggled to support themselves and their families.

A paper published in the British Medical Journal suggests that the same pattern is now visible in Britain. The suicide rate had been dropping steadily in the UK for 20 years before the recession hit, but in 2007-2008 it rose by 8% among men and 9% among women. Academics from the Universities of Liverpool and Cambridge, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, investigated the figures to try to establish whether the recession was the cause.

They looked at information on suicides in 93 regions held by the National Clinical and Health Outcomes Database for the decade from 2000-2010, and also examined from the Office for National Statistics the numbers of unemployed people claiming benefits.

They found that the suicide rate among men rose by 1.4% for every 10% increase in unemployment. Between 2008-2010, they say, 846 more men ended their life than would have been expected had the downward trend continued; the corresponding number for women was an extra 155 suicides.

On average, male unemployment rose by 25.6% in each of those years, while the male suicide rate rose by 3.6% each year. When male employment rates rose briefly in 2010, the suicide rate dropped slightly.

Source: The Guardian

NEBOSH to attend inaugural OSH India event

Health, safety and environmental examinations body NEBOSH has announced it will be present at the inaugural OSH India event this year.

The Occupational Safety & Health (OSH) trade exhibition and seminar programme will take place in Mumbai, India between 18th and 19th October, and is set to attract visitors from throughout the region.

Over the past twenty years, India's economy has grown to become one of the largest in the world. An influx of foreign investment and sustained growth has turned the country into a globally significant exporter and importer of goods and services.

This economic development has led to greater importance being placed on health and safety standards in the region. This has been driven in part by the presence of global corporates and an increasing desire among Indian employers to improve welfare standards.

Demand for NEBOSH qualifications in India has grown significantly during the past five years. NEBOSH courses began to be offered by local providers in 2007 and since then the number of people taking NEBOSH courses in India has grown by more than 100% year-on-year. Improved employment prospects have increased demand for NEBOSH qualified individuals particularly in the oil and gas and construction industries.

NEBOSH International Manager Stuart Naylor commented: "We've witnessed a significant increase in demand for our qualifications throughout the world in recent years. More than half of NEBOSH examinations are now taken outside of the UK.

"India, alongside Asia and the Middle East, has helped to establish NEBOSH as a global benchmark of excellence in the field of health and safety, which is why we are delighted to attend and support this new important international event."

NEBOSH will be exhibiting at stand 2 on the Ground Level, please come and visit us. For further information about the OSH Expo India event, visit www.oshindia.com.

The National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health (NEBOSH) was formed in 1979 and is an independent examining board and awarding body with charitable status. NEBOSH offers a comprehensive range of globally-recognised, vocationally-related qualifications designed to meet the health, safety, environmental and risk management needs of all places of work in both the private and public sectors.

Courses leading to NEBOSH qualifications attract around 35,000 candidates annually and are offered by around 500 course providers around the world. NEBOSH examinations have been taken in around 100 countries. NEBOSH qualifications are recognised by the relevant professional membership bodies including the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) and the International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (IIRSM).

Contact: Julia Whiting, Communications Co-ordinator, NEBOSH | Tel: + 44 (0)116 263 4724 | Mobile: +44 (0)7850 204072 | Email: julia.whiting@nebosh.org.uk

Report from Canada: Preventing Violence among Employees of the Same Work Organisation - Evaluation of a Participatory Intervention

A new Canadian study published by the IRSST evaluates a participatory intervention aimed at reducing interpersonal workplace violence in three Québec detention facilities of different sizes (small/medium/large). In particular, the researchers sought to describe the intervention development and implementation process, and to evaluate the impacts of the intervention on organizational practices and on the prevalence of interpersonal violence. The population targeted by this study consisted of correctional officers.

This study identified organizational practices that help reduce violence among such employees. Many types of workplaces, as they too take action to address the problem in their own contexts, could draw inspiration from the proposed process and consider the organizational changes introduced in this project.

The results of this study may therefore promote the implementation of joint participatory interventions for the purpose of improving the work situation of employees exposed to major tensions.

To download the document: www.irsst.qc.ca/en/-irsst-publication-preventing-violence-among-employees-of-the-same-work-organization-evaluation-of-a-participatory-intervention-r-739.html

Ireland's guidance on Health and Safety at Work in Residential Care Facilities

Ireland's Health and Safety Authority has published this guidance which is intended for owners, managers and employees of residential care facilities such as elderly, people with disabilities, respite and convalescent care facilities. It will also be useful for other similar type facilities. The guidance is designed to help an employer to manage safety, health and welfare at work and to help employers and employees to understand and meet their duties under occupational safety, health and welfare legislation.

National Authority for Occupational Safety and Health, August 2012, ISBN 9781844961641

Health and Safety at Work In Residential Care Facilities

Ensuring Best Practice for Passive Fire Protection in Buildings

The Association for Specialist Fire Protection Ireland (AFSPI) has produced this new guidance Ensuring Best Practice for Passive Fire Protection in Buildings to improve fire safety in Ireland.

AFSPI has published this guidance document ahead of the introduction of the new Building Control (Amendment) Regulations 2012, in Ireland.

The guide is aimed at supporting designers, contractors, fire protection officers and legislators better understand the requirements of the new regulations.

The proposals were set out in a document issued by the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government (DECLG) titled "Strengthening the Building Control System". Among the proposals are the introduction of mandatory certificates of compliance by builders and designers and improved inspection arrangements.

Preventing or controlling ill health from animal contact at visitor attractions: Industry Code of Practice from Farming and Countryside Education (FACE)

Every year millions of people visit premises where members of the public, particularly children, are encouraged to view or touch animals. All animals naturally carry a range of micro-organisms, some of which cause no illness in the animal but can be transmitted to humans. Diseases passed from animals to humans are known as zoonoses.

Some zoonotic diseases may cause ill health; in some cases the diseases may be severe or life threatening. Equally, some are more amenable than others to treatment, and some may leave lasting ill health.

A range of zoonotic diseases can be acquired from animal contact at visitor attractions including: Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli or VTEC of which E. coli O157 is one, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chlamydophilia abortus (formally called Chlamydia psittaci), Toxoplasmosis, Salmonella spp.

People can become infected with micro-organisms through consuming contaminated food or drink, through direct contact with contaminated animals, by contact with an environment contaminated with animal faeces or by being bitten. Very low numbers of micro-organisms can cause human infection.

A review by the Health Protection Agency (HPA), published in 2010, found that there were 55 outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease linked to petting farms between 1992 to 2009 in England and Wales.

The purpose of this Code of Practice is to help ensure visitor health and safety by providing sensible, practical and proportionate guidance on preventing or controlling ill health at visitor attractions.

This Code of Practice is aimed at the owners, operators and managers of such visitor premises.

It provides guidance, including pictures and real-life case studies, of practical measures which can be applied at premises to comply with the law and keep visitors safe. The examples are from businesses, ranging from conventional farms that open to the public for one day a year to attractions that may cater for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.

Premises covered by the Code of Practice include:

Farm attractions such as open farms and farm parks, animal contact enclaves within other attractions, including those at zoos, City farms or other educational establishments, Working farms with livestock that occasionally open to the public, e.g. for school visits or to participate in Open Farm Sunday or similar events, Rare breed and rescue centres, Agricultural shows or country fairs where livestock are present, Travelling menageries or mobile petting enterprises, Other similar visitor attractions at which the public have contact with animals.

www.face-online.org.uk/CodeofPractice

Tackling Violence against Retail Staff

This British Retail Consortium (BRC) survey found that at least 35,000 staff had suffered from physical or verbal attacks. Retail robberies had also risen by 20% when compared to the previous year. The country's retail sector, which employs nearly three million people, is identified as a vital contributor to the economy and to the regeneration of deprived areas.

However, according to the BRC's Annual Retail Crime Survey, for every 1,000 employees there were 26 incidents of verbal abuse or threats, an increase of 83% on 2010.

This rise was chiefly in verbal abuse but retail robberies also rose by 20% on the previous year. In areas where there is a greater fear of violence and intimidation, retailers report a greater turnover of staff and higher incidents of sickness/absence. Unfortunately, many employees now appear to accept this abuse as "part of the job", a misconception that retailers are working hard to correct.

New guidelines, Tackling Violence against Staff, recommend a range of steps retailers can take to keep their staff safe. The BRC said although there are a number of guidelines in its document, they are often simple and cost little to implement. It is hoped the new guidelines will encourage greater reporting of incidents by outlining good practice examples of the support provided to retail employees facing violence and abuse in the workplace.

The aim of the BRC's guidelines for retailers is to increase awareness of the impact that violence against staff has on retail employees and to challenge the perception that daily abuse is acceptable. The guidelines will encourage greater reporting of incidents by outlining good practice examples of the support provided to retail employees facing violence and abuse in the workplace. The guidelines also promote greater prevention of offences by setting out good practice in identifying and responding to potential triggers for violence and abuse.

www.brc.org.uk/downloads/Tackling_Violence_Against_Staff.pdf

Recent European Union legislation

The following new legislation will be of interest to readers:

The TUC Workplace manual: A practical handbook for union representatives

Union reps are the unsung heroes of Britain's workplaces. This manual from the Trades Union Congress (TUC) is a complete reference work for safety representatives in one volume, providing practical advice on the whole range of issues they are likely to encounter in supporting members in the workplace.

https://www.tuc.org.uk/publications/tuc-workplace-manual-2nd-edition

Rail Human Factors around the World: Impacts on and of People for Successful Rail Operations

The rail human factors/ergonomics community has grown quickly and extensively, and there is much increased recognition of the vital importance of ergonomics/human factors by rail infrastructure owners, rail operating companies, system developers, regulators and national and trans-national government. This book, the third on rail human factors, is drawn from papers presented at the Lille 3rd International Conference on Rail Human Factors.

The contributions cover the range of human and organisational issues on the railway, from driving to signalling and control to maintenance and engineering work, to passengers and security issues such as trespass, and address improvements in safety, reliability, use of capacity, efficiency and quality.

The book represents the best of recent work in rail human factors, and starts to define the framework for the next few years. As well as the human factors areas listed above, the conference and thus the book are notable for sessions on simulation in rail human factors and on human factors in metro design and operation.

The book also reflects the increased attention being paid to, and developments in, understanding all aspects of rail stakeholders' behaviour, and also the contribution of ergonomics/human factors to innovative network control systems which will enhance reliability, safety and use of capacity.

The book will be of interest to a number of groups: those working in the rail sector from a human factors point of view; the larger rail industry and related bodies generally; and in terms of transferrable knowledge to ergonomists and human factors specialists working in other industries.

Rail Human Factors around the World: Impacts on and of People for Successful Rail Operations
by Wilson, John R.; Mills, Ann; Clarke, Theresa; Rajan, Jane; Dadashi, Nastaran
Taylor and Francis, 8 August 2012, 868 pages

www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9780415644754

Designing Safe Road Systems: A Human Factors Perspective

Many books focus on individual differences and how those relate to traffic safety such as accident proneness, gender differences, age, alcohol, and the effects of drugs. Others focus on the safety effects regarding the vehicle such as airbags, anti-lock brakes, navigation systems, intelligent cruise control and other new gadgets coming to the vehicle. Even though these topics are undoubtedly important for traffic safety, this book takes a unique approach as it focuses solely on the road environment. Designing Safe Road Systems provides the background for those who want to know more about the effects of road design on driving behaviour. It uses a systems approach to allow a better understanding of why and in what circumstances drivers may commit errors. This understanding will ultimately lead to road systems that prevent (fatal) errors from occurring.

The book contains an overview of the current models and theories about human performance and human behaviour in traffic that are relevant for all those involved in designing safe road systems. The central theme of this book is how design principles can reduce the probability of an error while driving.

The authors demonstrate how knowledge of human factors helps a road authority to better understand how road users behave. They argue that in many cases the design of the environment can be further adjusted to human capabilities, and that safety should be considered a system property to be built into the road system.

Contents: Foreword; Introduction; Sell-explaining roads and traffic system; Resilience to failure and breakdown; The performance of road users: hierarchical task levels; Workload management; Information carriers meet basic ergonomic principles; Individual information elements are consistent and uniform within their context; Risk averse side effects of measures; Motivational aspects; Variation in performance; Communicating with the road user; Summary and conclusions.

Designing Safe Road Systems: A Human Factors Perspective
Theeuwes, Jan; van der Horst, Richard; Kuiken, Maria
Ashgate Publishing, August 2012, 190 pages, ISBN: 9781409443889

www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calcTitle=1&pageSubject=346&title_id=11700&edition_id=15238

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) Prevention Manual from Canada

In Canada, musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) account for the most lost time injuries, the highest lost-time claim costs, and the most lost time work days of any type of injury. Worker's compensation board figures from various jurisdictions indicate that MSDs account for 25% to 60% of total annual compensation claims.

MSDs are often painful and disabling. They can interfere with all kinds of tasks at work, at home, and in recreation. Even in early stages, recovery from MSDs often requires months or even years of treatment. In severe cases, there may be permanent disability.

This manual from the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) is a resource for employers and workers to help identify, eliminate, and control the sources of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) in their workplaces. It focuses on how manual material handling tasks contribute to MSDs. It provides techniques to help eliminate injuries, and provides guidelines for the development of a MSD program for your workplace.

The purpose of this manual is to: Help you identify and understand the risk factors causing musculoskeletal disorders for manual material handling tasks and, Provide guidance and tools for developing a MSD prevention program.

This manual explains what musculoskeletal disorders are, how and why they occur, and how to identify the risk factors that cause them. The manual also outlines how to develop a program that is focused on the elimination of MSD risk factors from workplaces, with emphasis on manual materials handling which includes lifting, pushing, and pulling tasks.

The information in this publication is based on best practice principles and techniques. The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance, rather than prescribe specific requirements, and is not intended as a legal interpretation of any federal, provincial or territorial legislation.

The focus of this manual is the identification and elimination of risk factors related to MSDs. Everyone at the workplace will benefit.

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) Prevention Manual
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), 2012

www.ccohs.ca/products/publications/msd

Health and Safety Report 2012: Oil and Gas UK

Oil & Gas UK launched its first ever Health & Safety Report, which will become an annual feature. The report details: a number of recent major improvements to offshore safety in the UK oil and gas industry; an overview of the various safety-related projects being carried out across the industry; an explanation of how the safety agenda is being effectively managed by Oil & Gas UK and its members; and a look ahead to the future.

In terms of safety performance, the report finds:

The report also details the considerable amount of work being done by Oil & Gas UK to continuously improve health and safety across the industry.

Ongoing projects include:

Health and safety report 2012: Oil and gas UK
United Kingdom Offshore Oil and Gas Industry Association (UKOOA), July 2012, 34 pages, ISBN 1903003878

http://oilandgasuk.co.uk/product-category/health-and-safety

Shale gas extraction in the UK: A review of hydraulic fracturing

The health, safety and environmental risks associated with hydraulic fracturing (often termed 'fracking') as a means to extract shale gas can be managed effectively in the UK as long as operational best practices are implemented and enforced through regulation.

Hydraulic fracturing is an established technology that has been used in the oil and gas industries for many decades. The UK has 60 years' experience of regulating onshore and offshore oil and gas industries.

This book Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing by the Royal Academy of Engineering covers the following:

Concerns that have been raised about the risk of fractures propagating from shale formations to reach overlying aquifers. The available evidence indicates that this risk is very low provided that shale gas extraction takes place at depths of many hundreds of metres or several kilometres. Geological mechanisms constrain the distances that fractures may propagate vertically.

Even if communication with overlying aquifers were possible, suitable pressure conditions would still be necessary for contaminants to flow through fractures.

More likely causes of possible environmental contamination include faulty wells, and leaks and spills associated with surface operations. Neither cause is unique to shale gas. Both are common to all oil and gas wells and extractive activities. Ensuring well integrity must remain the highest priority to prevent contamination. The probability of well failure is low for a single well if it is designed, constructed and abandoned according to best practice.

The UK's well examination scheme was set up so that the design of offshore wells could be reviewed by independent, specialist experts. This scheme must be made fit for purpose for onshore activities. Effects of unforeseen leaks or spills can be mitigated by proper site construction and impermeable lining. Disclosure of the constituents of fracturing fluid is already mandatory in the UK.

Ensuring, where possible, that chemical additives are non-hazardous would help to mitigate the impact of any leak or spill.

Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing
Royal Academy of Engineering, June 2012, 76 pages

www.raeng.org.uk/news/publications/list/reports/Shale_Gas.pdf

A model syllabus for the training of technicians involved in the examination, testing, maintenance and repair of petroleum road tankers, 2nd edition

The Energy Institute has published the second edition of the syllabus is essential reading for all those involved in road tanker fleet operations, maintenance and repair workshops and those with responsibility for the training of road tanker technicians.

It has been developed to provide companies that undertake the maintenance of petroleum road tankers with a syllabus for training technicians and to satisfy road tanker operators that those responsible for the maintenance of road tanker service equipment have an understanding of the safety implications of the equipment.

It promotes:

The syllabus sets out the knowledge requirements for technicians involved in the testing, inspection, maintenance and repair of petroleum road tankers, together with recommendations for technician assessment and certification.

Topics that should be covered in training courses are divided into two sections. Each section is sub-divided, with a summary of the required learning outcomes and recommended practical exercises or other aids.

This publication has been updated in response to the increased use of contractor facilities and personnel in place of petroleum company owned and operated facilities for maintenance and repair work.

Key technical changes in the new edition include:

Note - This second edition replaces the edition published in 2004. The syllabus refers to legislation applicable in the UK; however it can still be used for training technicians working outside the UK.

A model syllabus for the training of technicians involved in the examination, testing, maintenance and repair of petroleum road tankers
Energy Institute, March 2012, 2nd edition, ISBN 978085293628

www.energyinst.org/information-centre/ei-publications/newpubs/model-syllabus-training-of-technicians-in-petroleum-road-tankers

Guidelines for the management of coating for external corrosion protection

These guidelines by the Energy Institute provide information to enable the development of a strategy for the management of external protective coatings for corrosion protection of offshore installations and to assist operators with maintaining the integrity of key components throughout the entire life of the installation, from construction through to decommissioning.

The guidance provided will also be of use to those involved in the maintenance of similar plant and structures deployed in other industries. It sets out examples of good practice in the areas of condition survey, assessment criteria, implementation of remedial campaigns, roles and responsibilities, communication and outlines the competency requirements for a range of key personnel. It also includes guidance on the principal activities associated with liaison between the operator and the contractor, including on-site and the development of performance measures (KPIs).

Guidelines for the management of coating for external corrosion protection will be of use to operations and integrity managers, corrosion engineers, technicians, contractors and inspectors, and all parties concerned with the maintenance, remediation and application of coating systems for both offshore and onshore oil, gas and power generation facilities.

Guidelines for the management of coating for external corrosion protection
Energy Institute, January 2012, ISBN 9780852936184

www.energyinst.org/information-centre/ei-publications/newpubs/guidelines-for-mgmt-of-coating-for-external-corrosion-protection