Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd

News from around the World

News Archive

July 2012

Contents
  1. Public consultation launched on SEAC's draft opinion on restricting four phthalates
  2. Health, Safety, Environment and Fire sources for those seeking validated, authoritative and constantly updated information
  3. ECHA publishes a practical guide for downstream users on exposure scenarios
  4. Road Safety Week 19-25 November 2012 to focus on Slower speeds = happy people
  5. CSB Releases New Safety Video on Inherently Safety Design and Technology
  6. Europe: Unions call for a new work safety strategy
  7. 57 European organisations and companies join the EU-OSHA campaign on "Working together for risk prevention"
  8. FIOH - Conference on Active Ageing at Work to be held in August, 2013
  9. October 2012 start for the UK HSE cost-recovery confirmed
  10. 12-13 September 2012 - Changing landscapes, Shaping a Progressive WSH Culture, Singapore
  11. Canadian News: Chemical Manual Assists Workplaces in Developing a Chemical Safety Programme
  12. US NIOSH News - July 2012
  13. A+A 2013 in Düsseldorf has now "kicked-off"
  14. UK Minister hails progress on health and safety regulatory reform
  15. Need Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information?
  16. Candidate List updated with thirteen new Substances of Very High Concern
  17. Health and safety in sawmills - HSG172: revised guidance
  18. HSG264: Asbestos - The survey guide
  19. The ASFP Guide to Inspecting Passive Fire Protection for Fire Risk Assessors
  20. Health and safety pays, even in difficult times: EU-OSHA's Annual Report 2011
  21. NEBOSH International Certificate now most popular
  22. Directory of Safety Devices for Industrial Machines - updated version
  23. New research report published: Occupational health provision on the Olympic Park and athletes' village

Public consultation launched on SEAC's draft opinion on restricting four phthalates

Concerned parties are invited to comment on the SEAC's draft opinion on a restriction proposal aiming to limit exposure to humans from four phthalates - DEHP, DBP, BBP, and DIBP - in consumer articles. The deadline for comments is 3 September 2012.

A public consultation of the restriction proposal, submitted by Denmark, on four phthalates took place from September 2011 to March 2012. The proposal has been discussed in ECHA's Committees for Risk Assessment (RAC) and Socio-economic Analysis (SEAC), taking into account the comments received during the earlier public consultation and the advice from the Forum for Exchange of Information on Enforcement.

RAC adopted its opinion concluding that the available data does not indicate that there is currently a risk from combined exposure to the four phthalates. The Committee was also of the opinion that existing regulatory measures and the consequential reduction in use would further reduce exposure. On the basis of these considerations, RAC concluded during its meeting in June that the proposed restriction is not justified.

In line with RAC's opinion, SEAC subsequently agreed on a draft opinion that there is no basis for a supportive opinion as risk from combined exposure was not demonstrated.

In accordance with the REACH Regulation, ECHA is now launching a public consultation on SEAC's draft opinion. Comments received will be reviewed and taken into account by SEAC in its final opinion, which is scheduled for adoption by 15 December 2012.

The Agency will then submit the opinions of RAC and SEAC to the European Commission. The final decision on the restriction will be taken by the European Commission.

Further information: https://echa.europa.eu/view-article/-/journal_content/title/public-consultation-launched-on-seac-s-draft-opinion-on-restricting-four-phthalates

Health, Safety, Environment and Fire sources for those seeking validated, authoritative and constantly updated information

In this fast moving world it is essential to have quick access to validated, authoritative and constantly updated information collections. Much time is spent these days searching the Internet for validated and authoritative information often resulting in out-of-date sources being retrieved. Collections brought together and maintained by information specialists are one sure way of getting good quality data.

As new research and new ways of working, with the attendant alterations in products, services and technology developments means that no-one, especially those responsible for fire, emergencies and preparedness in workplaces of all kinds, should be without the latest information.

Check out for yourself the OSH UPDATE, FIREINF and IRISH OSH UPDATE electronic collections. These sources of information are offered by the long established Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd.

Searchers should also be aware that the myth abounding in the world that "everything is published on the Internet and is free" is just NOT true!

To request a free 15 day trial of OSH UPDATE, FIREINF and IRISH OSH UPDATE www.sheilapantry.com/interest

ECHA publishes a practical guide for downstream users on exposure scenarios

The new guide for downstream users provides tips for checking whether the uses and use conditions of a chemical substance are covered by exposure scenarios provided by suppliers with the Safety Data Sheet. It includes advice on the action to take based on the outcome of this check.

The practical guide provides an overview of the main duties of downstream users with regard to exposure scenarios under REACH and the associated timescale. It presents examples which illustrate common issues faced by downstream users when they compare their actual uses and the conditions of use with the information provided by suppliers. Practical tips on how to undertake a check and the options for follow up actions are also provided.

It also includes advice on how and when to prepare a downstream user chemical safety report and to report unsupported use to ECHA.

The publication has been developed with input from the Downstream Users of Chemicals Coordination Group (DUCC), in particular with regard to the practical examples.

To further develop the guide and the examples, ECHA is encouraging downstream users to submit actual experiences. Contributions should be sent to ECHA using the form "contact the ECHA Information Desk" available on the ECHA Contact web page.

Further information: https://echa.europa.eu/view-article/-/journal_content/title/echa-publishes-a-practical-guide-for-downstream-users-on-exposure-scenarios

Road Safety Week 19-25 November 2012 to focus on Slower speeds = happy people

Road Safety Week 2012, the UK's biggest road safety event, will take place 19-25 November. The charity Brake, which coordinates the Week, is encouraging organisations, particularly fleet operators, to start planning now how they will take advantage of the event to promote safe driving to staff and show their commitment to road safety in the wider community. Organisations can log onto the Road Safety Week website to get ideas and register to receive free resources to help them take part.

Road Safety Week, now in its 16th year, is a great time to run training or awareness-raising activities for employees to promote a safe driving culture, or launch new policies and initiatives aimed at reducing crashes or promoting sustainable travel. It's also an opportunity for organisations to gain valuable media recognition and engage the community to raise awareness about road safety as part of their CSR strategy.

Organisations can access free electronic resources and guidance to help them get involved. Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk and click on 'organisations' for initial ideas and to register to take part and get a free e-action pack (which will be emailed out from August). This includes downloadable posters to display during the Week, plus advice, and case studies of what other organisations have done in previous years.

Every year Brake picks a theme to focus on through its Road Safety Week media campaign. Organisations can choose to run their initiative on this or any other road safety topic.

According to Andy Cuerden, managing director at Interactive Driving Systems: 'For many years now a number of our clients and partners including BT, Royal Mail, Iron Mountain, Suckling Transport and Wolseley have utilised road safety week to focus on key issues within their organisation, and within the communities in which they operate. It is an excellent opportunity to engage teams, their families and friends in road safety, and as a showpiece landmark event to plan program launches and re-launches around. At Interactive Driving Systems our experiences over many years suggest that work-related road safety is a conduit for community road safety and can leverage many branding, social responsibility and other benefits for organisations. Yet again this year we are running our own communications program for Road Safety Week, and encouraging all our clients and partners to participate'.

Brake's main theme for 2012 is 'Slower speeds = happy people'. Through national and regional media, Brake will be raising awareness of the importance of making it safer for people to walk and cycle in their own community, to get to work or school, and for their health and enjoyment. Brake will be calling on drivers to slow down to 20 mph around homes, schools and shops, explaining that it's a life-saver because it gives you a good chance of stopping in time in an emergency.

Dr Will Murray, Research Director, Interactive Driving Systems | Direct dial: + 44 (0) 115 846 2994 | Tel: + 44 (0) 1484 551060 | Mobile: +44 (0) 7713 415454 | Email: Will.murray@virtualriskmanager.net | Web: www.virtualriskmanager.net | Fleet Safety Benchmarking: www.fleetsafetybenchmarking.net

CSB Releases New Safety Video on Inherently Safety Design and Technology

Inherently Safer: The Future of Risk Reduction Examines how Industry Can Eliminate or Reduce Hazards

The US Chemical Safety Board today released a new safety video that examines the concept of inherent safety and its application across industry; Inherently Safer: The Future of Risk stems from the August 28, 2008, explosion that killed two workers and injured eight others at the Bayer CropScience chemical plant in Institute, West Virginia. As a result of ongoing concern regarding the safety of the facility Congress directed the CSB to commission the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to study the feasibility of reducing or eliminating the inventory of methyl isocynanate (MIC) stored at the Bayer plant.

The NAS study explored how the concept of Inherent Safety could be applied at the Bayer facility. The NAS panel noted that the goal of inherently safer design is not only to prevent an accident, but to reduce the consequences of an accident should one occur. The eleven-minute video features interviews with NAS panel members and staff as well as commentary from the CSB Chair and investigators.

The video is available to stream or download on www.csb.gov and may be viewed on the CSB's YouTube channel, USCSB https://www.youtube.com/user/uscsb. DVD copies of the CSB's safety videos can be requested by completing the online request form.

In the video CSB Chairperson Rafael Moure-Eraso discusses the findings from the CSB's investigation and the catastrophic consequences that the 2008 accident could have had on the surrounding community, The CSB determined that the explosion at Bayer could have caused a release of MIC into the nearby community. And it raised a question - was there an inherently safer alternative to storing and using this highly toxic chemical?

The NAS report found that while Bayer and previous owners of the site incorporated some considerations of inherently safer technology, these companies "did not perform systematic and complete inherently safer process assessments on the processes for manufacturing MIC or the carbamate pesticides at the Institute site. Thus large amounts of MIC, phosgene, and other toxic materials were produced or stored at the site for decades".

The video discusses the four main components of inherently safer design as identified by the NAS study. They are substitute, minimize, moderate and simplify and are described as:

The video includes an interview with industry expert Dennis Hendershot, "Inherently safer design is a philosophy for design and operation of any technology, including chemical processing. It's not a specific technology or a set of tools and activities, but it's really an approach to design and it's a way of thinking."

On March 18, 2011, Bayer announced that it would not seek to restart MIC production at the plant and would end the manufacturing of carbamate pesticides deemed hazardous by the World Health Organization. The Bayer plant no longer produces or stores MIC. But the CSB believes the NAS study and other publications illustrate how the chemical industry could benefit from incorporating the principles of inherently safer design into making decisions - decisions which will satisfy the interests of chemical companies, workers, and members of the communities near their plants.

The video concludes with a call from CSB Chairperson Rafael Moure-Eraso for industry to look towards the future. The principles of inherently safer processing can be an effective way for chemical companies to eliminate or reduce hazards, prevent accidents, and protect nearby communities.

The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating industrial chemical accidents. The agency's board members are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate. CSB investigations look into all aspects of chemical accidents, including physical causes such as equipment failure as well as inadequacies in regulations, industry standards, and safety management systems.

The Board does not issue citations or fines but does make safety recommendations to plants, industry organizations, labor groups, and regulatory agencies such as OSHA and EPA. Visit website, www.csb.gov

Europe: Unions call for a new work safety strategy

Unions are calling for an ambitious European agenda on workplace health and safety, and are demanding EU-wide action to tackle work-related cancers and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). They warn that the economic crisis should not be used as an excuse to backtrack on safety standards.

The European Commission's consultants have accepted the need for a new EU strategy, but the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) says the proposals so far completely ignore the 'fundamental' role of labour inspectorates and safety representatives. 'The crisis cannot be used as an excuse to deregulate health and safety rules or delay action on hazardous substances killing tens of thousands of workers a year in Europe', ETUC confederal secretary Judith Kirton-Darling told an official EU conference. 'It is in a crisis, that worker protection must be strengthened to avoid long term health damage which will increase the cost to the public purse and the workers concerned.'

Laurent Vogel, coordinator of the workers' group in the European Advisory Committee on health and safety, added: 'We have to have better engagement in tackling the impact of rising precariousness at work in Europe, this labour market trend is driving the increase in stress and work-related diseases.'

ETUC news release and resolutions on a new occupational safety and strategy and action on musculoskeletal disorders.

57 European organisations and companies join the EU-OSHA campaign on "Working together for risk prevention"

EU-OSHA has announced the first wave of official European campaign partners of its Healthy Workplaces Campaign 2012-2013, "Working together for risk prevention". Among the 57 campaign partners is a wide range of organisations, including European social partners, both interprofessional and sectoral, multinational companies and non-profit, pan-European organisations representing different sectors.

Watch the video

FIOH - Conference on Active Ageing at Work to be held in August, 2013

The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) is organising an International Conference "Work, Wellbeing and Wealth: Active Ageing at Work".

The event will bring together researchers, experts and European networks in the area to discuss the major research and development needs and solutions.

The conference will take place from 26 to 28 August 2013 in Helsinki, Finland.

www.ttl.fi/en/international/conferences/work_well_being_and_wealth

October 2012 start for the UK HSE cost-recovery confirmed

The UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) cost-recovery scheme, known as Fee for Intervention (FFI), will begin on 1 October 2012, subject to Parliamentary approval, the regulator has announced.

As well as confirming the start date for the scheme, the HSE has also published initial guidance explaining how the scheme will work in practice, along with examples illustrating how it will be applied.

The scheme was originally expected to come into force in April but was postponed following the HSE's decision to take more time to discuss certain "technical details" and carry out a test run.

Announcing the date of the scheme's launch 29 June 2012), HSE programme director Gordon MacDonald stressed that law-abiding businesses will not pay a penny and that the Executive will only recover costs from duty-holders that are found to be in material breach of health and safety law.

"We have worked with industry representatives in shaping the final form of the scheme, and the published guidance explains how the scheme will work and what businesses can do to comply with the law and avoid incurring a fee," he explained. "It is right that those who break the law should pay their fair share of the costs to put things right, and not the public purse. Firms who manage workplace risks properly will not pay."

Detailed advice on the scheme's operation is now available in a newly published guidance document on the HSE's website. The guidance includes a number of examples of material breaches but does not cover every scenario where FFI might apply. It also explains how the scheme will operate in accordance with the HSE's existing Enforcement Management Model (EMM) and the Enforcement Policy Statement (EPS).

The process for handling queries and disputed invoices is also covered, although full guidance on these procedures will be published on the HSE website in advance of the Health and Safety (Fees) Regulations 2012 - under which FFI is being introduced - coming into effect.

The new guidance confirms that the fee payable by duty-holders found to be in material breach of the law is £124 per hour, except where work is contracted to the Health and Safety Laboratory, or a specialist third party, in which instances the actual cost to the HSE of the service will be recovered from the duty-holder. The fee includes all work that is needed to identify a material breach and all work to ensure that the breach is remedied.

FFI will apply when an inspector:

Invoices will generally be sent to duty-holders every two months, and payment is due to the HSE within 30 days of the date of the invoice.

With disputes, all initial inquiries will be treated as a query for which no fee is payable. However, if duty-holders are not satisfied with the response to their query, they can formally dispute the invoice by writing to the HSE and setting out the specific reasons why they do not believe the charge is valid. A fee is payable for handling disputes.

Existing arrangements for making an appeal against an Improvement or Prohibition Notice remain unchanged.

Steffan Groch, a partner at DWF solicitors, said FFI is of particular concern for smaller businesses. "Depending on experience and style, some inspectors may take longer than others to complete the investigation, which will undoubtedly lead to discrepancies across the board, meaning some businesses could pay much more than others," he explained.

"Apart from knowing that the hourly rate will be £124, businesses will have no way of knowing what the final bill will come to until the very end of the case. What's more, there appears to be no room for discussion or negotiations until this stage either, as the first time that a business can raise an objection is when they receive the invoice for the investigation. Ultimately, it is smaller businesses that are going to suffer as a result of the FFI regulation."

The initial 'Guidance on the application of Fee for Intervention' is available at www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hse47.htm but a final version will be published prior to the start date of the scheme.

12-13 September 2012 - Changing landscapes, Shaping a Progressive WSH Culture, Singapore

The Singapore WSH Conference 2012 is co-organised by the WSH Council, Ministry of Manpower (MOM) and WSH Institute, and supported by strategic partners - National Trades Union Congress (NTUC), the Singapore National Employers Federation (SNEF), International Labour Organization (ILO), Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) and Singapore Institution of Safety Officers (SISO).

Contact: Singapore WSH Conference Secretariat | Tel: +65 9128 8113 | Fax: +65 6270 0262 | Email: secretariat@singaporewshconference.sg | www.singaporewshconference.sg

Canadian News: Chemical Manual Assists Workplaces in Developing a Chemical Safety Programme

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) has released a new health and safety manual to assist small and medium sized businesses in outlining the elements of a chemical health and safety program.

The Implementing a Chemical Safety Program manual will provide workplaces with step-by-step guidance on understanding, controlling and how to work safely with chemicals.

"If chemicals are not used, stored and handled properly, they can cause injury, illness, disease, fire, explosions, or property damage," says Jan Chappel, Senior Technical Specialist at CCOHS. "This guide was written to assist workplaces in developing a chemical safety program to reduce health and safety risks, lower environmental impact, and reduce operation costs."

The manual includes 5 main parts:

CCOHS publications are unique in that they are developed by experts in the field, and reviewed by representatives from labour; employers and government to ensure the content and approach are unbiased and credible.

More information about the Implementing a Chemical Safety Program manual is available on the CCOHS website.

For further information contact:

Eleanor Westwood, Manager - Communications, Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) | (905) 572-2981, Ext. 4408 | E-mail: eleanor.westwood@ccohs.ca www.ccohs.ca

Jennifer Miconi-Howse, Communications Officer, Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) | (905) 572-2981, Ext. 4241 | E-mail: jennifer.miconi-howse@ccohs.ca | www.ccohs.ca

US NIOSH News - July 2012

The Monthly Newsletter of the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health - Volume 10, Number 3, July 2012

This edition covers:

A NIOSH Nanotechnology Update

Nanotechnology allows for the manipulation of matter on a near-atomic scale to produce new structures, materials and devices. This technology, and the advanced sophisticated materials it creates, promises scientific advancement for many sectors such as medicine, consumer products, energy, materials and manufacturing. As with any new technology, the earliest and most extensive exposure to emerging and uncharacterized hazards is most likely to occur in the workplace, where these new materials and tools are first developed and used.

Stakeholders and policymakers widely agree that a critical question should be addressed to support the safe development of this revolutionary technology. The question is this:

Do nanomaterials pose health or safety risks to workers employed in their manufacture and industrial use?

In the last decade, the public and private sectors began to identify the strategic research necessary for engaging that question and incorporating prudent risk management and risk assessment into the rapid introduction of these advanced materials into commerce.

AIHA Honours the Late John Palassis

At its annual meeting in June, the American Industrial Hygiene Association announced the John Palassis Memorial Award (formerly the Outstanding Member Award) to honour the memory of the late John Palassis, who retired from NIOSH in 2010 after 33 years of service.

John's work at NIOSH produced significant impact in the field of industrial hygiene through worker training, outreach to small businesses, and the development of consistent and comprehensive safety and health program standards.

www.aiha.org/get-involved/VolunteerGroups/Pages/Communication-and-Training-Methods-Committee.aspx

There are also many items covering other subjects - see the July 2012 newsletter: www.cdc.gov/niosh/enews/enewsV10N3.html

A+A 2013 in Düsseldorf has now "kicked-off"

The exhibitor registrations for the international No. 1 trade fair for safety and health at work (5 to 8 November 2013) are already in full swing. Registrations can be completed quickly and easily online at www.AplusA.de/1330

From December 2012 the hall layout planning will begin on a clearly structured basis in keeping with the main themed areas: safety at work, security at work, specialized equipment for disaster relief, health at work.

In addition to the trade fair, and in keeping with a well-established tradition, the second key area at A+A 2013 is the 33rd A+A-Congress. The international congress organized by the German Federal Association for Occupational Safety and Health (Basi - Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft für Sicherheit und Gesundheit bei der Arbeit) is the leading joint event for industrial safety and corporate health promotion in Germany with content focused on the central theme areas "Safety, Health, Ergonomics". As a highly respected programme component, the multi-national appeal of the A+A Congress is exemplified by the conference given by the International Labour Organization (ILO), which in 2013 is once again offering a dialogue and information platform on worldwide trends in the area of personal protection and accident prevention at work.

Turkey will be the partner of the A+A 2013 event.

Information online: www.aplusa.de

i. A. Martin-Ulf Koch, Manager Press Department, G2-PR/ Presseabteilung - Press Department, Messe Düsseldorf GmbH, Stockumer Kirchstr. 61, 40474 Düsseldorf, Germany | Tel: +49 (0) 211/4560-444 | Fax: +49 (0) 211/4560-8548 | email: KochM@messe-duesseldorf.de | www.messe-duesseldorf.de | www.messe-duesseldorf.com

UK Minister hails progress on health and safety regulatory reform

Getting rid of regulations won't undermine the UK's good record on health and safety but will improve its bad record on red tape, said Employment minister Chris Grayling, as he launched a progress report on implementation of the Government's health and safety reforms.

Speaking to a gathering of representatives from some of the country's main trade and industry bodies in London RECENTLY the minister emphasised what is being done to help their members - particularly small and medium-sized businesses - understand and comply with their health and safety duties.

He referred to the progress made so far on implementing the recommendations of both Professor Ragnar Löfstedt and Lord Young of Graffham in the wake of their recent reviews of the health and safety system in the UK. The 29-page report - A progress report on implementation of health and safety reforms - was published on the on 18 June 2012 - details what has been completed, is ongoing, and is yet to be initiated with regard to six areas for reform identified in the Löfstedt review, published at the end of last year, and the 35 recommendations made by Lord Young in Common sense, common safety, published in October 2010.

'Closed-out' tasks include the HSE's evaluation of the CDM Regulations 2007, publication of new guidance to clarify PAT testing requirements, the establishment of challenge panels to allow for cases of incorrect application of health and safety legislation to be addressed, and the extension of the reporting period under RIDDOR 1995 from three to seven days.

Need Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information?

In this fast moving world it is essential to have quick access to validated, authoritative and constantly updated information collections. Much time is spent these days searching the Internet for validated and authoritative information often resulting in out-of-date sources being retrieved.

Health, Safety, Environment and Fire information Collections brought together and maintained by information specialists are one sure way of getting good quality data.

As new research and new ways of working, with the attendant alterations in products, services and technology developments means that no-one, especially those responsible for fire, emergencies and preparedness in workplaces of all kinds, should be without the latest information.

These sources of information are offered by the long established Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd.

Searchers should also be aware that the myth abounding in the world that "everything is published on the Internet and is free" is just NOT true!

Request a free 15 day trial www.sheilapantry.com/interest

Candidate List updated with thirteen new Substances of Very High Concern

ECHA has added thirteen new Substances of Very High Concern (SVHCs) to the Candidate List. All substances included are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic for reproduction.

Four substances have been identified as SVHCs under the precondition that they contain certain carcinogenic constituents above the concentration limit for classifying these substances as carcinogenic. Five of the new SVHCs have been included in the Candidate List following a scrutiny of the comments received during the public consultation and the unanimous agreement of the Member State Committee (MSC). The further eight substances, which did not receive comments challenging the identification as SVHCs during public consultation, were directly added to the Candidate List.

The update of the Candidate List also comprises a consolidation of the entries of aluminosilicate refractory ceramic fibres (Al-RCF) and zirconia aluminosilicate refractory ceramic fibres (ZrAl-RCF) included in the List in January 2010 and December 2011. The scope of the more recent Al-RCF and ZrAl-RCF entries fully covers the earlier ones, which therefore could be consolidated in the entries from December 2011. There is now one entry for Al-RCF and one for ZrAl-RCF. Companies that comply with their obligations to notify substances in articles arising from the entries of 2010 are not required to take further action; their notifications will be assigned by ECHA to the consolidated entries.

The legal obligations that companies may have resulting from the inclusion of substances in the Candidate List apply to the listed substances on their own, in mixtures or in articles. Producers and importers of articles containing any of the 13 substances included in the Candidate List by 18 June 2012 have six months from today to notify ECHA by 17 December 2012, if both of the following conditions apply: (1) the substance is present in those articles in quantities totalling over one tonne per producer or importer per year and (2) the substance is present in those articles above a concentration of 0.1% weight by weight. There are exemptions from the notification obligation if the substance is already registered for the use or when exposure can be excluded. Information on the notification of substances in articles and related submission tools, as well as a manual with instructions on how to create and submit a notification dossier are available on ECHA´s website.

The Candidate List now contains 84 substances. As foreseen by REACH, a specific procedure will be followed to decide whether the substances should also be included in the List of Substances Subject to Authorisation (Annex XIV of the REACH Regulation).

Further information: https://echa.europa.eu/view-article/-/journal_content/title/candidate-list-updated-with-thirteen-new-substances-of-very-high-concern

Health and safety in sawmills - HSG172: revised guidance

Although standards of health and safety are much improved over recent years, sawmilling remains a high-risk industry. This revised guidance comprehensively updates and expands the original Health and safety in sawmilling published in 1997.

www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg172.htm

HSG264: Asbestos - The survey guide

This heavily illustrated publication is aimed at people carrying out asbestos surveys and people with specific responsibilities for managing asbestos in non-domestic premises under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.

www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg264.htm

The ASFP Guide to Inspecting Passive Fire Protection for Fire Risk Assessors

The ASFP is pleased to announce the publication of a new addition to its extensive range of Guidance documentation. The ASFP Guide to Inspecting Passive Fire Protection for Fire Risk Assessors is aimed at all those involved in the specification, installation or maintenance of passive fire protection.

The guide is NOW AVAILABLE to download in PDF format. To download your PDF visit http://asfp.associationhouse.org.uk/default.php?cmd=213

This document is also available in a robust A5 spiral bound hard copy format at £20.00 (£14.50 for ASFP full and Affiliate members).

ASFP, Kingsley House, Ganders Business Park, Kingsley, Bordon, Hampshire GU35 9LU, UK | Tel: +44 (0) 1420 471612 | Fax: +44 (0) 1420 471611 | www.asfp.org.uk

Health and safety pays, even in difficult times: EU-OSHA's Annual Report 2011

In its latest annual report, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work -EU-OSHA continues to argue for investment in workplace health and safety, for economic as well as ethical reasons.

Highlights of the year include the flagship Foresight project on green jobs; secondary analysis of the data collected by the ESENER survey; the official launch of the OiRA risk assessment tool and the last year of the Safe Maintenance Campaign.

NEBOSH has revealed that its International General Certificate has become its most popular qualification worldwide.

The NEBOSH International General Certificate in Occupational Health and Safety has overtaken the NEBOSH National General Certificate when it comes to annual registrations. Between April 2011 and 2012, there were 40,775 registrations to sit units of the NEBOSH International General Certificate compared to 37,426 for the National General Certificate.

"The National General Certificate, which in one form or another has been around for 23 years, contains UK health and safety law," explained Teresa Budworth, NEBOSH Chief Executive. "A few years ago it became clear that people from outside the UK were also looking to gain a NEBOSH Certificate. So in 2005 we launched our international version, the International General Certificate."

"To be honest, it's quite staggering the level of growth in popularity of the International General Certificate. Five years ago, in 2007/08, there were just 2,683 registrations for this qualification."

The International Certificate becoming more popular than the National Certificate is a further sign of NEBOSH's growing relevance and reputation throughout the world.

When looking at NEBOSH's current qualifications, including its three Diplomas, almost half of its registrations now come from outside the UK, compared to just a third a year ago. Of these overseas registrations, 39% come from the Middle East and 31% from Asia. Registrations from Africa are also now emerging, accounting for 12%.

Joel Nedamo, who is Health and Safety Advisor for the entire Dubai World Trade Centre complex, commented: "Taking my NEBOSH International General Certificate broadened my knowledge and gave me more confidence. It put me on the pathway to achieving my NEBOSH International Diploma and helped me secure the role I now have."

Teresa Budworth added: "When it comes to health, safety and environmental management, NEBOSH is no longer a name that's only recognised in the UK, but is seen as a mark of excellence everywhere."

Contact: Julia Whiting, Communications and Marketing Manager, NEBOSH | Tel: +44 (0)116 263 4724 | Email: julia.whiting@nebosh.org.uk | www.nebosh.org.uk

Directory of Safety Devices for Industrial Machines - updated version

The Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST) in Canada has just made available the updated version of its directory on industrial machine safety devices.

Available in English and in French, the directory contains useful information on the manufacturers of the safety devices most frequently used in Québec. Besides identifying the most popular products, the site presents some 150 manufacturers and 76 safety devices grouped in 10 classes. Without being exhaustive, it also includes electrical, programmable electronic, mechanical, pneumatic and hydraulic safety devices. The directory allows professionals to rapidly find information such as the names and addresses of manufacturers that offer the type of device sought.

Accessible and user-friendly, this directory will facilitate the process for those who want to promote the prevention of accidents by making industrial machines or processes safer. Besides helping professionals find potential solutions to machine safety problems, this tool informs them about new technologies in this field.

To consult the directory, please visit: www.irsst.qc.ca/en/directory-of-safety-devices-for-industrial-machines-home.html

Or contact: Maura Tomi, M. Sc., Communication advisor, Communications and Knowledge Transfer Division, IRSST, Canada | Tel: +1 514-288-1551 ext. 302 | Fax: +1 514-288-0998

New research report published: Occupational health provision on the Olympic Park and athletes' village

The occupational health provision on the Olympic Park and Village has been recognised by the construction industry and beyond as exemplary. Much of the good practice is transferrable to companies and projects of all sizes.

Report prepared by the Institute for Employment Studies for, and jointly funded by, the Health and Safety Executive and the Olympic Delivery Authority 2012

Occupational Health Provision on the Olympic Park and Athletes' Village: www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr921.htm