Sheila Pantry Associates Ltd

Focus

Focus Archive

Be prepared for the future – Learn from the Past

January 2019
Sheila Pantry OBE

Sometimes we are too busy with the here and now we just do not think about what the past may have to offer us in many ways, especially working safely and healthily in the workplace.

History of Occupational Safety and Health website

The History of Occupational Safety and Health website starts with the first piece of legislation in The Act for the preservation of the Health and Morals of Apprentices and others employed in Cotton and other Mills, and Cotton and other Factories 1802 and covers the major milestones in the development of workplace health and safety over 200 plus years.

An invaluable resource for students, lecturers, trainers, health and safety professionals and others with a general interest in industrial history, the site sets out developments from the 1802 Factory Act all the way through to the most recent regulatory changes made by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

It provides a wealth of information for those wishing to track the development of occupational safety and health, be they teaching or studying for professional or academic qualifications or carrying out other research, showing how this area has been at the heart of the UK’s industrial history.

Numerous pieces of legislation have been introduced over more than 200 years, covering a wide array of different industries, but their shared aim has been to ensure that workers can go home to their families safe and healthy at the end of each day.

It is important to value the history of occupational safety and health, not just to honour its pioneers but to develop a sense of perspective about what needs to be done to continue to tackle preventable harms associated with work, not just in Britain but around the world.

For years now in my work as an occupational safety and health information specialist I have handle thousands of documents, articles from magazines, reports and papers presented at conferences and talked with and listened to people, including inspectors worldwide and have constantly wondered why we never seem to learn lessons from incidents and accidents in the workplace.

Also have a trial of OSH UPDATE + FIRE which has over 1,147,750 records including over 109,776 full text documents – much larger than contents of most health and safety information centres/libraries!

There are many other examples of lessons learned in the reports, results from research, guidance and advice available in OSH UPDATE + FIRE to help organisations – managers, directors, supervisors and workers and especially those teaching in colleges and universities to learn about the all aspects of working safely and healthily in all workplaces.